Staff Finds: Sexual Harassment Policy Documents

By , November 21, 2017

SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not a compliment. It’s offensive and illegal. Joint Committee on the Status of Women, 1984.

In October, Simmons College’s freshman seminar, “What the Health is Going on in Boston?” led by Professor John Lowe, came to visit the Center for the History of Medicine. Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine, Joan Ilacqua, and Reference Archivist, Jessica Murphy, exhibited materials from Archives for Women in Medicine collections and led a discussion about gender in academic medicine.

In addition to documents from the Myrtelle Canavan papers (including enlarged photographs of “Brains of Feebleminded and Criminalist Persons”), and the Grete Bibring papersJessica presented items from the E. Tessa Hedley-Whyte papers highlighting Dr. Hedley-Whyte’s work on a committee to explore sexual harassment at Harvard Medical School.

Among the documents the committee referenced were the 1989 Faculty of Arts and Sciences policy on sexual harassment (available to view via OnView) and a pamphlet created by the Joint Committee on the Status of Women entitled “SEXUAL HARASSMENT is not a compliment. It’s offensive and illegal.”

 

 

 

The pamphlet includes a note from the Longwood Campus deans, including Daniel C. Tosteson, Dean of Harvard Medical School, Paul Goldhaber, Dean of Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and Harvey V. Fineberg, Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, stating:

“Sexual harassment is unacceptable. It is discriminatory and unlawful. It can cause personal anguish as well as career damage. It is an assault upon an individual’s dignity, and it corrupts the academic merit system.”

The pamphlet cites examples of harassment, including:

My fellow workers leave pornographic pictures at my lab bench. It has gotten to the point that I dread going to work.”

After seeing a copy of ‘Gay Community News’ on my desk, a couple of people in my department continually made sexually explicit comments and left articles about AIDS in my mailbox.”

At a weekly staff meeting, my chairman pointed to my pregnant belly and said, ‘I hope you’ll be as productive at work as you’ve been in your extra-curricular activities.”

The pamphlet also lays out steps a person can take if they have been harassed, as well as suggested guidelines for people in positions of authority. The entire pamphlet is available via OnViewInformation on Harvard Medical School’s current Sexual and Gender based Harassment Policy is available here.

For more information about this collection, or if you are interested in bringing your class to the Center for the History of Medicine, contact Public Services staff.

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Rare Haitian Reports Donated and Digitized For Access

By , November 10, 2017

One of the four reports from the PISP Project, now digitized and available through the Internet Archive.

The Center for the History of Medicine was recently gifted two sets of the four-volume report, “Projet Intègre de Santé et de Population”, which was co-sponsored by the Division d’Hygiène Familiale of the Ministère de Santé Publique et de Population and the Harvard School of Public Health (now the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), and published in Port au Prince, Haiti between 1978 and 1982.

The reports follow three defined rural populations in Haiti (approximately 30,000 people) from 1974-1978, and include family census forms and vital sign data recorded by both resident home visitors and trained community health workers. The reports are often sought after for reference, although very few volumes exist and all have yet to be translated from the original French.

The first set of reports were donated to the Center by Dr. Gretchen Berggren as part of the Gretchen Glode and Warren L. Berggren Papers, 1967-2010 (inclusive). Gretchen and her late husband Warren launched groundbreaking community health programs in several countries in the developing world, most particularly in Haiti at the Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles. Both have been affiliated with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health; Warren was an associate professor of tropical public health and population sciences from 1972 to 1981, and Gretchen was affiliated with the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies from 1974 to 1989.

A second set of the reports were later donated to the Center for the History of Medicine by Dr. Henry Perry (Johns Hopkins School of Public Health), in recognition of their connection to the Berggrens and the Harvard Chan community.

These four volumes are indeed rare. Prior to the Center’s receipt of the complete sets, only two of the four volumes were available at other institutions. Additionally, the Haitian printing press involved in their distribution had long ago been destroyed during an earthquake. After receiving the reports, the Center quickly cataloged them and financed their digitization, making them available electronically through the Internet Archive.

The reports can now be accessed through the following sources:

  1. Demographie et fecondite. Port-au-Prince, Haiti : Les éditions Fardin, [1978?]. (Link to digital version)
  2. Recherches sur la medecine traditonnelle : dans l’aire du projet integre de sante et de population du district sanitaire de Petit-Goave. [Haiti] : Departement de la santé publique et de la population, Division d’hygiène familiale, 1979. (Link to digital version)
  3. Enquete sur la nutriton et la sante. Port-au-Prince, Haiti : Les Ateliers Fardin, [1979?]. (Link to digital version)
  4. Administration et organisation d’un programme communautaire de sante? et de population en milieu rural. Port-au-Prince, Haiti : Les Ateliers Fardin, 1982. (Link to digital version)

 

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The Paul Charles Zamecnik papers are open for research

By , October 31, 2017

0004657_drefThe Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the Paul Charles Zamecnik papers, 1910-2011 (inclusive), 1931-2009 (bulk). Zamecnik (1912-2009) was a microbiologist and molecular biologist whose research spanned eight decades. Zamecnik is known for his work on protein synthesis and the discovery of transfer RNA, accomplished with colleagues Mahlon Hoagland (1921-2009) and Mary Louise Stephenson (1921-2009). Later in his career, he discovered antisense oligonucleotides and explored their therapeutic potential, and was the first to publish evidence for the existence of microRNA.

A graduate of Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (1933) and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (1936), Zamecnik interned at the Collis P. Huntington Memorial Hospital and then at Cleveland, Ohio’s University Hospitals. Zamecnik was a fellow at the Carlsberg Laboratories, Copenhagen, Denmark, but returned to the work at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York, New York, after the 1940 Nazi invasion of Denmark. He held a teaching position at Harvard Medical School during the war, and was then given his own laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital focusing on the mechanisms of protein synthesis. In 1956, Zamecnik became the Collis P. Huntington Professor of Oncologic Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and continued his research at Massachusetts General Hospital until his retirement as Professor Emeritus in 1979. At that time, he moved his research laboratory to the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research, where he remained until 1997 when that foundation was absorbed by the University of Massachusetts. Zamecnik returned to Massachusetts General Hospital’s Cancer Center as a Senior Scientist, where he continued to work until weeks prior to his death in 2009. In 1990, he cofounded Hybridon, Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, whose work focused on the development of antisense drugs; this company merged with Idera Pharmaceuticals in 2004. In 2009, Zamecnik cofounded Zata Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Worcester, Massachusetts, with David Tabatadze; this company continues to explore the therapeutic possibilities of antisense oligonucleotides.

 

Data from Zamecnik's research that led to the discovery of transfer RNA

Data from Zamecnik’s research that led to the discovery of transfer RNA

The papers are the product of Zamecnik’s activities as a microbiologist and molecular biologist, researcher, author, professor, and administrator. The papers contain: Zamecnik’s research records, including those relating to transfer RNA and antisense oligonucleotides; professional correspondence, writings and publications records; records from talks, symposia, presentations, and conferences Zamecnik attended; Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital records; and photographs and slides relating to his research, teachings and presentations, and travel.

The finding aid for the Zamecnik papers can be found: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HMS.Count:med00256 .

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the  Public Services staff.

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Partners in Health documentary Bending the Arc opens in Boston

By , October 17, 2017
From left to right: Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, Dr. Paul Farmer, and Bending the Arc Arc writer Cori Shepherd Stern, at the Coolidge Corner Theater, October 11, 2017. Photograph courtesy Dan Phipps.

From left to right: Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, Dr. Paul Farmer, and Bending the Arc writer and producer Cori Shepherd Stern, at the Coolidge Corner Theater, October 11, 2017. Photograph courtesy Dan Phipps.

Bending the Arc, the story of Partners in Health physicians, founders, and humanitarians Ophelia Dahl, Paul Farmer, and Jim Yong Kim, is garnering critical kudos from The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, Salon, and a host of others, not to mention being an official selection for nine major film festivals. But as any documentary filmmaker will tell you, stories of this kind don’t make it to the screen without substantial support from archivists and researchers. In Bending the Arc’s case, that support came from Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, who helped the filmmakers identify records (including video) for the film from the Center’s Partners in Health organizational records, 1990-2006, and Paul Farmer papers, 1990-2009. On October 11, Bending the Arc celebrated its opening night at the Coolidge Corner Theater with a screening and a reception. During the post-screening panel, Kief Davidson (director/producer), Cori Shepherd Stern (writer/producer), and Paul Farmer personally thanked Jess, making her stand up so everyone could applaud for her. The Center congratulates Jess on the well-deserved acknowledgement! More information about the film is available here.

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Announcing the 2017-2018 Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation Fellows

By , September 11, 2017
Maria Dazenbichler

Maria Daxenbichler

Maria Daxenbichler is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University at Buffalo. She holds a Magistra Artium degree in American Studies from Leipzig University, Germany, and a M.A. in American Studies from the Transnational Studies department at the University at Buffalo. Her dissertation investigates how medical researchers in the U.S. changed the field of gynecology between the 1880s and 1920s. Through developing new and allegedly safe abortion techniques, they strengthened their authority over women’s health, reproduction, and medical treatments. They then shared their new knowledge with medical and nursing students in teaching hospitals, thus helping to further professionalize the medical field and establish the authority of formally trained practitioners. She also received a research fellowship from the University of Illinois at Chicago for this project.

Ms. Daxenbichler plans to utilize the Records of New England Hospital for Women and Children, Records of Boston Lying-In Hospital, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital Records, George Richard Minot Papers, Edward Peirson Richardson Papers, and the Papers of James Read Chadwick.

 

Jordan Katz

Jordan Katz

Jordan Katz is an advanced doctoral student in the Department of History at Columbia University. She specializes in early modern Jewish history, with interests in Jewish cultural history, history of science, and Jewish communal autonomy. Her dissertation examines the role of Jewish midwives and medical women within communal and intellectual frameworks in the early modern Ashkenazic world. She is also interested in culinary history and historical reconstruction.

Ms. Katz has received fellowships from the Center for Jewish History and the Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme – Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes. Her work has been published in Jewish Quarterly Review.

At the Center, Ms. Katz will consult several 16th and 17th century midwifery treatises including Samuel Janson’s 1680 Korte en Bondige verhandeling, van de voort-teeling en t’ kinderbaren met den aenklave van dien.

We look forward to hosting both fellows at the Center this year!

 


The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation Fellowship is offered in partnership with the Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation (formerly the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine). Information regarding the Fellowship program is available at http://www.wimlf.org/fellowships and https://www.countway.harvard.edu/chom/archives-women-medicine-fellowships.

A program of the Center for the History of Medicine at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, the Archives for Women in Medicine actively acquires, preserves, promotes, and provides access to the professional and personal records of outstanding women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences.

 

The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation, formerly the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine, was founded with the strong belief that understanding our history plays a powerful role in shaping our future. The resolute stand women took to establish their place in these fields propels our vision forward. We serve as stewards to the stories from the past, and take pride in sharing them with the women of today. Our mission is to preserve and promote the history of women in medicine and the medical sciences, and we look forward to connecting you to our collective legacy that will empower our future.

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Oct. 17, 2017: 42nd Annual Joseph Garland Lecture “Measuring Value in Healthcare”

By , August 25, 2017

The Boston Medical Library presents:

Measuring Value in Healthcare

42nd Annual Garland Lecture

Peter J. Neumann, Sc.D.: Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center & Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

 

Join us for Dr. Peter J. Neumann’s talk on the promises and pitfalls of using formal cost-effectiveness analysis to help the United States achieve better value for its health spending. Dr. Neumann, founder and director of the Cost-Effectiveness Registry, focuses his investigations on the use of comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness analysis in health care decision making.

 

shutterstock_129463487Tuesday, October 17, 2017

5:30 PM

Amphitheater, Armenise Building
Harvard Medical School
210 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115


To register, please contact the Boston Medical Library at BostonMedLibr@gmail.com or 617-432-5169.

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Oct. 19, 2017: Going Crazy at Work: The History of Carbon Disulfide

By , August 25, 2017

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Going Crazy at Work: The History of Carbon Disulfide”

Paul Blanc, M.D: Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco

 

The second in a series of four lectures given as the 2017 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

carbon-disulfide-3d-balls

Thursday, October 19, 2017
4:00-5:30 PM

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

 

 

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Warren Museum Closed 11/23 and 11/24

By , November 22, 2017

Eagle skeleton prepared by Oliver Wendell Holmes. Warren Anatomical Museum in the Countway Library of Medicine

The Warren Museum Exhibition Gallery on the 5th floor of the Countway Library of Medicine will be closed Thursday and Friday for the Thanksgiving holiday. The entire Countway, including the Warren Museum, will reopen on Monday, 11/27. More about the Museum’s and Library’s hours can be found on the Countway website.

 

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Warren Museum Exhibition Gallery Closing at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 3rd.

By , October 31, 2017

The Warren Anatomical Museum Exhibition Gallery is closing early on Friday, November 3rd. There will be no public admittance after 3:00 pm. This coincides with the larger closing of the Countway Library of Medicine. As usual, there will be no access to the Gallery on Saturday or Sunday.

More information about visiting the Warren Museum Exhibition Gallery can be found on the Center for the History of Medicine website.

 

Skull and life mask of Phineas Gage, Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

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2018-2019 Boston Medical Library Fellowships in the History of Medicine at the Countway Library

By , October 26, 2017
Herbolarium de virtutibus herbarum (Vincenza: Leonardus Achates, de Basilea, and Guilelmus de Papia, 27 October 1491). Ballard 368. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

Herbolarium de virtutibus herbarum (Vincenza: Leonardus Achates, de Basilea, and Guilelmus de Papia, 27 October 1491). Ballard 368. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine is pleased to offer annual fellowships to support research in the history of medicine. Established in 1960 as a result of an alliance between the Boston Medical Library and the Harvard Medical Library, the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine is the largest academic medical library in the United States. The Countway Library maintains a collection of approximately 700,000 volumes. Its Center for the History of Medicine holds 250,000 books and journals published before 1920, including 802 incunabula. The department’s printed holdings include one of the most complete medical periodical collections, an extensive collection of European medical texts issued between the 15th and 20th centuries, and excellent holdings of pre-1800 English and pre-1900 American imprints. The book collection is strong in virtually every medical discipline and is particularly rich in popular medicine, medical education, public health, Judaica, and travel accounts written by physicians. The Countway’s collection of archives and manuscripts, approximately 20 million items, is the largest of its kind in the United States. The manuscript collection includes the personal and professional papers of many prominent American physicians, especially those who practiced and conducted research in the New England region, or who were associated with Harvard Medical School. The Countway Library also serves as the institutional archives for the Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Harvard School of Public Health. The printed, manuscript, and archives holdings are complemented by an extensive print and photograph collection and the collections of the Warren Anatomical Museum. Established in 1847, the museum houses an exceptional collection of medical artifacts, pathological specimens, anatomical models, and instruments.

The Boston Medical Library Fellowships in the History of Medicine at the Countway provide stipends of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019. Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and may be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic. Preference will be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway. The application, outlining the proposed project (proposal should not exceed five pages), length of residence, materials to be consulted, and a budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses, should be submitted, along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation, by February 15, 2018.

Applications should be sent to:

Boston Medical Library Fellowships
Center for the History of Medicine
Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
10 Shattuck Street
Boston, MA 02115.

Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials may be sent to: chm@hms.harvard.edu.

Awards will be announced in April 2018.

The Boston Medical Library’s Abel Lawrence Peirson Fund provides support for the fellowship program.

The Boston Medical Library is a physicians’ non-profit organization, incorporated in 1877. Its mission is “to be a Library for the dissemination of medical knowledge, the promotion of medical education and scholarship, and the preservation and celebration of medical history, and thereby to advance the quality of health and healthcare of the people.” Today there are over 300 fellows of the Boston Medical Library. In 1960, the Boston Medical Library entered into an agreement with the Harvard Medical School Library to combine staff, services, and collections into one modern biomedical facility. The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine opened in 1965 and ranks as one of the largest biomedical libraries in the world.

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Nutshell Studies Loaned to Renwick Gallery for Exhibition

By , October 13, 2017
Frances Glessner Lee and Alan R. Moritz working with furnishings for the Nutshell Studies, 1948. Records of the Department of Legal Medicine, Harvard Medical Library

Frances Glessner Lee and Alan R. Moritz working with furnishings for the Nutshell Studies, 1948. Records of the Department of Legal Medicine, Harvard Medical Library

In 1946, Frances Glessner Lee donated the first ten models of what have become known as the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death to Harvard Medical School’s Department of Legal Medicine. She followed that gift with seven more models in 1948, eventually giving a total of eighteen Nutshells to the Medical School. The Nutshells, intricate dioramas depicting mysterious homicides, suicides, and natural deaths, were built by Lee to serve as teaching tools for the Harvard Associates in Police Science seminars that she hosted each year. In 1967, the Department of Legal Medicine closed, and Harvard loaned the Nutshell Studies to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Baltimore, Maryland, where Department of Legal Medicine alumnus Russell Fisher was the medical examiner. Fisher moved the Harvard Associates in Police Science seminars to Baltimore and kept the teaching mission of the Nutshells alive.

For the first time since being loaned to Baltimore, the eighteen Harvard Nutshells will be on display for the public. They are being hosted by the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery for their exhibition Murder is Her Hobby. In addition to the Harvard Nutshells, the exhibition will also display a nineteenth Glessner Lee Nutshell from the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, courtesy of the Bethlehem Heritage Society. The exhibition will run from October 20, 2017 to January 28, 2018. More information regarding Murder is Her Hobby can be found on the Renwick Gallery website, in the Washington Post, and in HMS news.

More information about the Department for Legal Medicine can be found in Corpus Delicti: The Doctor as the Detective, a physical and digital exhibit curated by Center for the History of Medicine Public Service Librarian Jack Eckert.

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A Brief History of Women at the Harvard Chan School

By , October 12, 2017

At “From Riding Breeches to Harvard: Stories of the First Female Harvard Chan School Graduate, Archives for Women in Medicine Project Archivist Joan Ilacqua presented a brief history of women at the Harvard Chan School.

Linda Frances James, 1919

Linda Frances James, 1919

It is now recognized that the Harvard Chan School, then the Harvard-MIT School of Public Health, was the first school at Harvard to credential women on the same basis as men. Graduates earned a certificate in public health at this early school from 1913 until 1922 (when it was renamed the Harvard School of Public Health).  Linda James, a member of the first class, was the first woman to earn this certificate in 1917. James was born in Minnesota in 1891 and earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota in 1914. She enrolled as a student at the Harvard-M.I.T. School for Health Officers, and earned her certificate of Public Health in 1917. She then took a position as the Director of After-Care Division at the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission. To learn more about Linda James, read “Lost and Found: The First Woman with a Harvard Credential.

 

Alice Hamilton, 1919

Alice Hamilton, 1919

The Harvard-MIT School of Public Health boasts the first woman appointed to a faculty position at any Harvard school. Alice Hamilton was hired as assistant professor and created the Department of Industrial Medicine in 1919. Her appointment was in the faculty of medicine, but her responsibilities were in the Harvard-MIT School of Public Health. Although Dr. Hamilton was Harvard’s first woman professor, she was denied three professorial privileges: she could not participate in Commencement; she could not join the Harvard Club; and she was not given complimentary football tickets. Dr. Hamilton retired in 1935.

The Harvard Chan School also has the honor of being the first school on the Longwood campus to grant degrees to women students. Ann Hogue Stewart and Hester Balch Curtis were both awarded the Master of Public Health in 1936 during Harvard University’s 300th Anniversary. Although it was thought that the Harvard Corporation would bestow degrees upon women in 1936, in actuality, pressure from an influential pediatrician, Martha May Eliot, was why the women were awarded their degrees. Over twenty years later, in 1957, Dr. Eliot became the first woman full professor at the Harvard Chan School and the Chair of the Department of Child and Maternal Health.

Martha May Eliot

Martha May Eliot

Dr. Eliot, whose collection resides at the Scheslinger Library, was a pioneer in maternal and children’s health, the first woman president of the American Public Health Association, the only woman to sign the founding document of the World Health Organization, and the Chief of the U.S. Children’s Bureau. She taught at the Harvard Chan School until her retirement in 1960.

Women were allowed to attend the Harvard Chan School for degrees after Harvard Medical School opened itself to coeducation in 1945. Since 1994, women have consistently made up approximately 60% of the student body at the Harvard Chan School.


To learn more about the Archives for Women in Medicine program, visit https://countway.harvard.edu/awm or contact Project Archivist Joan Ilacqua at Joan_Ilacqua@hms.harvard.edu.

To learn more about the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health archives, visit https://www.countway.harvard.edu/chom/harvard-th-chan-school-public-health-archives or contact Archivist Heather Mumford at Heather_Mumford@hms.harvard.edu.

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