Category: Exhibits and Events

New Exhibit at the Countway Library Commemorates Harvard Medical School’s Relief Efforts during World War I

By , February 15, 2017

Soldiers Wounded at the Battle of the Somme Arriving at No. 22 General Hospital, 1916 [0004184]

Soldiers Wounded at the Battle of the Somme Arriving at No. 22 General Hospital, 1916 [0004184]

Although the United States did not enter World War I until April 1917, American medical personnel were active in war relief efforts from nearly the beginning of the conflict. Harvard Medical School—its faculty and its graduates—played a key role in this relief work by providing staff for French and English hospitals and military units, and these early endeavors provided invaluable experience once America came into the war and the need to organize and staff base and mobile hospitals for the U.S. Army became critical to the war effort.

Noble Work for a Worthy End, a new exhibit at the Countway’s Center for the History of Medicine, charts Harvard’s participation in this medical relief work and experiences in military medicine and surgery through the wealth of first-hand documentation preserved by the men and women who volunteered their time and labor, sometimes at great sacrifice, to helping the sick and wounded of the First World War. Highlights of the display include records of the Harvard University Service organized by Harvey Cushing at the American Ambulance Hospital in Paris.  This unit’s brief sojourn in the spring of 1915 is documented through photographs and postcards, publications, and a copy of Elliott Carr Cutler’s daily journal of his experiences.

The Medical School’s most enduring contribution to the war effort was the Harvard Surgical Unit, which first arrived in Europe in July 1915.  Inspired by Sir William Osler, the unit provided physicians, surgeons, dentists, and nurses to staff the British Expeditionary Force’s No. 22 General Hospital at Camiers, France. The exhibit includes photograph albums, letters, drawings, newsclippings, Paul Dudley White’s diary account of a case of shell shock, medical field cards and case notes, and unusual ephemera, including an armband worn by members of the Unit and an enamel pin presented by the Harvard Corporation to the unit’s nurses, along with a testimonial of gratitude from King George V.

Final Inspection of Harvard Unit at Fort Totten, N.Y., May 11, 1917 [0003947]

Final Inspection of the Harvard Unit at Fort Totten, N.Y., May 11, 1917 [0003947]

Once the United States entered the European conflict, Harvard faculty and students became involved with staffing base hospitals for the Army. The exhibit also chronicles the work and experiences at Base Hospital No. 5, a unit formed from Harvard and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital personnel.  Base Hospital No. 5, one of the first units to reach France, remained on loan to the British Expeditionary Force for the duration of the war, at which point it had treated some 45,000 soldiers, and, notably, sustained casualties from an air raid bombing on September 4, 1917. Photographs, a letter from Harvey Cushing describing the air raid, and records of Walter B. Cannon’s research on surgical shock are all included.

Noble Work for a Worthy End: Harvard Medical School in the First World War is on display on the first floor of the Countway Library of Medicine and open to the public, Monday through Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm. A companion online exhibit is also available here .

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Center hosts Massachusetts high school students for Phineas Gage symposium

By , December 6, 2016
Microsoft Word - Phineas Gage Flyer.docx

Colloquium on Phineas Gage flyer, Courtesy of Nancy Donlon

The Center for the History of Medicine hosted forty students and seven teachers from six area high schools on November 28th for a half-day “Colloquium on Phineas Gage: A Scientific Inquiry.” The AP Psychology and AP Biology students came from schools across eastern Massachusetts and included Medford High SchoolBurlington High SchoolJohn D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and ScienceArlington High SchoolBraintree High School, and Dedham High School. The program was developed and organized by Medford High School AP Psychology teacher Nancy Donlon and was generously supported by the Medford Educational Foundation. Director Scott Podolsky, MD and Warren Museum curator Dominic Hall participated from the Center.

The students were exposed to a panel of Harvard Medical School and independent scholars who presented diverse material on the historical character of Gage and on modern medicine’s

Phineas Gage colloquium t-shirt. Courtesy of Kaitlin Donlon.

Phineas Gage colloquium t-shirt. Courtesy of Kaitlin Donlon.

understanding of the human brain. Harvard Medical School associate professor and Massachusetts General Hospital neurosurgeon Frederick Barker, MD placed the Gage narrative within the 19th-century debates surrounding neuroscience and the rejection and adoption of cerebral localization. Independent scholar Matthew L. Lena discussed the problematic fictions that have been tied to Phineas Gage’s patient history and how one integral case study can inform, support or hinder modern medical practice. The panel concluded with associate director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School assistant professor Steven Schlozman, MD‘s presentation on the modern understanding of how adolescent and teenage minds hold information and processes emotion through the construction of narratives.

The colloquium ended with the students breaking into groups and exploring the content presented from the three panelists and their renewed sense of the Gage narrative.

 

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HMS LXX: 70 Years of Women at Harvard Medical School

By , November 15, 2016

 

Excerpts from an oral history interview with Raquel E. Cohen, member of HMS’ first coeducational class compiled for HMS LXX

On October 21, 2016, Harvard Medical School celebrated over 70 years of women at Harvard Medical School. The event highlighted several milestones, including the 70th anniversary of Harvard Medical School’s first coeducational class, the appointment of the 250th woman as a full professor, the 20th anniversary of the Eleanor and Miles Shore 50th Anniversary Fellowship Program for Scholars in Medicine, which supports junior faculty, the funding of the Elizabeth D. Hay Professorship in Cell Biology, the 10th anniversary of the Archives for Women in Medicine, and over 40 years of the Joint Committee on the Status of Women.

The event featured a series of curated conversations with women in medicine, from medical students to international leaders in health, addressing issues of women’s leadership, challenges faced by women in medicine, and work done by women at the forefront of women’s health. The event was punctuated by a keynote conversation with Shirley Tilghman, President Emerita of Princeton University and member of The Harvard Corporation.

First class of women accepted to Harvard Medical School, 1945. (HMS, Classes and Reunions, 00100.057)

First class of women accepted to Harvard Medical School, 1945. (HMS, Classes and Reunions, 00100.057). Cohen is pictured in the top row, second to right.

The “Women’s View at HMS: Then and Now” panel featured a video excerpting highlights from Raquel Cohen’s 2006 oral history interview. Cohen, an internationally recognized expert in the field of intervention and assistance to survivors of disasters, earned her Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1942, and was a student in Harvard Medical School’s first coeducational class, graduating in 1949.

Although Dr. Cohen could not attend HMS LXX in person, highlights of her oral history, curated by Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine Joan Ilacqua, detail just a few moments of her fascinating life story. Dr. Cohen’s full oral history is available via Onview, and additional oral histories with women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences are available at: tiny.cc/womeninmedicine.

To learn more about the Archives for Women in Medicine, visit: countway.harvard.edu/awm.

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November 9: “Pyrrhic Progress – Antibiotics and Western Food Production (1949-2015)”

By , November 4, 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine presents:

Pyrrhic Progress – Antibiotics and Western Food Production (1949-2015)

Dr. Claas Kirchhelle: Research Associate, University of Oxford’s Martin School and the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine; Junior Research Fellow, Wolfson College

pig

This presentation will examine the history of antibiotic use in Western food production. It will ask why antibiotics were introduced to food production, track the development of agricultural antibiotic use on both sides of the Atlantic, and explore why regulations designed to curb bacterial resistance and antibiotic residues differ in the US and Europe.

Dr. Claas Kirchhelle’s work addresses the history of antibiotic use, resistance, and regulation on both sides of the Atlantic. In 2016, his dissertation Pyrrhic Progress was awarded the University of Oxford’s annual Dev Family Prize for the best thesis in the field of history of medicine.

 

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
1:00pm [NEW TIME]
Lunch served at 12:30pm

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, use our online registration form or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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December 15: “From Attendants to Nurses: Philanthropy, Psychiatry and American Nursing 1940-1955”

By , October 12, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“From Attendants to Nurses: Philanthropy, Psychiatry and American Nursing 1940-1955”

6d822a15c164b94c14ec3be06c7001ceKylie M. Smith BA (Hons), PhD: Assistant Professor, Andrew W Mellon Faculty Fellow for Nursing and the Humanities, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

The third in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

Thursday, December 15, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

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November 17: “Madness, Politics, and Society: Toptasi Mental Asylum”

By , October 12, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Madness, Politics, and Society: Toptasi Mental Asylum”

insane-patients-in-the-toptascca7c4b1-mental-asylumFatih Artvinli, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor of the History of Medicine and Ethics, Acibadem University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey

The second in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

Thursday, November 17, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

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October 18: “The Great Moment and the Advent of Anesthesia”

By , October 12, 2016

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine at the Countway Library present:

Movie Night: The Great Moment and the Advent of Anesthesia

On the heels of the 170th anniversary of the first successful public demonstration of anesthesia at MGH, join us for two cinematic interpretations of that fateful day. We will screen “The Great Moment,” a 1944 film directed by Preston Sturges, which focuses on dentist William T.G. Morton; and “The Advent of Anesthesia,” a short, silent 1936 film in which contemporary MGH staff reenacted the events of October 16, 1846. (Hint: One of these films is pretty true to history, and the other is … not.)

 

Movie Night poster3_trimmed

 

Tuesday, October 18, 2016
6:00-8:00pm

Light refreshments will be served.

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation
Massachusetts General Hospital
2 North Grove Street, Boston MA 02114

To register, email mghhistory@partners.org or call 617.724.2755.

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October 21: HMS LXX: 70 Years of Women at HMS

By , September 21, 2016

HMS LXX

70 Years of Women at HMS

Sponsored by The Archives for Women in Medicine, Harvard Medical Alumni Association, Joint Committee on the Status of Women, Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, The Center for the History of Medicine, Office for Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Partnership, and the Office of Faculty Affairs

 

HMSLXX_Banner

 

Join us for this celebration recognizing important milestones for women at HMS over the past 70 years, including the admittance of women students, creation of The Archives for Women in Medicine, appointment of the 250th woman as a full professor, and more.

 

October 21, 2016

Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

 

Seating is limited. Registration is first come, first served.
Tickets are $75 per person and include symposia, reception, and seated dinner.

For more information and for registration, visit the official event page.

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October 20: “Dr. Saul Hertz Discovers the Medical Uses of Radioiodine”

By , September 21, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Dr Saul Hertz (HMS’29) Discovers The Medical Uses of Radioiodine (RAI): Academic Politics and Prejudice In the Birth of Radionuclide Therapy ”

Lewis E. Braverman, M.D., F.A.C.E.: Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine
Frederick H. Fahey, D.Sc.:  Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School
M. Sara Rosenthal, Ph.D.:  Professor of Bioethics, University of Kentucky

 

800px-SaulHertz_PortraitThe first in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

 

Thursday, October 20, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

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