Register Now! Human Tissue Ethics in Anatomy, Past and Present: From Bodies to Tissues to Data

By , March 6, 2019

9:00am-3:00pm, Thursday, April 4, 2019
Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall, Harvard Medical School Campus

Co-sponsored by the Ackerman Program on Medicine and Culture, Harvard University; the Center for the History of Medicine in the Francis A. Countway Library; the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital

NIH Technicians (ID 2263)

Technicians examining plates and tissue culture flasks at a laminar flow hood, 1986. Courtesy National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (ID 2263).

Anatomy as a science and as an educational discipline in the medical curriculum is forever in transition. One of the greatest areas of change in recent decades has been the systematic evaluation of ethical questions in anatomy. At the center of these deliberations is the status of the dead human body, which is no longer only seen as a mere “object” or “material” of research or as an educational “tool.” Rather, it is described as a body that still has connections with the person who once inhabited it, thus becoming part of a social network of knowledge gain and requiring respectful treatment.

This change of perspective will be explored in the symposium, “Human Tissue Ethics in Anatomy, Past and Present: From Bodies to Tissues to Data.” An international group of scholars will discuss the ethical aspects of existing questions, explore the relevance of non-profit and for-profit body donation, and examine newly emerging technologies in anatomy that may need innovative ethical approaches. The aim of this symposium is to present evidence for the insight that transparent and ethical anatomical body and tissue procurement is indeed at the core of medical ethics in research and education.

Registration is required. Register here.


PROGRAM

9:00-10:30am
Panel 1: Human Tissue Ethics in Historical Contexts of Anatomy:
Scott H. Podolsky, Harvard Medical School, Chair

  • Dominic Hall, Harvard Medical School: The Second Life of Specimens: Scientific and Historical Research in the Warren Anatomical Museum
  • Sabine Hildebrandt, Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital: Dealing with Legacies of Nazi Anatomy: the ‘Vienna Protocol’
  • Tinne Claes, Katholieke Universiteit: Why Is It So Difficult to Throw Away Fetuses? Anatomical Collections and the Meanings of Disposal

10:30-11:00am
Break

11:00-12:30pm
Panel 2: Human Tissue Ethics in Current Anatomical Education and Research:
Dan Wikler, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Chair

  • Thomas Champney, University of Miami: The Business of Bodies: Human Tissue Ethics and Commercialization
  • Michel Anteby, Boston University: Nested Moralities: From National to Intimate Cadaver Trades
  • Glenn Cohen, Harvard Law School/Petrie-Flom Center: The Law and Ethics of Tissue Ownership

12:30-1:30pm
Lunch (provided)

1:30-3:00pm
Panel 3: Human Tissue Ethics from Physical Specimens to Data:
David S. Jones, Harvard University, Chair

  • Joanna Radin, Yale University: Frozen Blood, Biobanks, and the Politics of Reuse
  • Maria Olejaz Tellerup, University of Copenhagen: The Anatomy of Bioavailability: Exploring Body Donation in Denmark Then, Now and in the Future
  • Jon Cornwall, University of Otago: The Impact of Digital Technology on Body Donation

Image: Technicians examining plates and tissue culture flasks at a laminar flow hood, 1986. National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (ID 2263, 1986).

Related LibGuide: Searching the Warren Anatomical Museum collection by Dominic Hall


        

 

Register now for the 2019 Estes Lecture with speaker Jeremy A. Greene

By , March 1, 2019

The Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, is pleased to share information about the 15th Annual J. Worth Estes Lecture.

To RSVP, please email the Boston Medical Library or contact Tara Peeler at 617-432-4807.

2019 Estes Lecture Poster

 

Apply Now for a 2019-2020 Boston Medical Library Fellowship!

By , February 19, 2019

Since 2003, the Boston Medical Library (BML) in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine has sponsored annual fellowships supporting research in the history of medicine using Center for the History of Medicine collections. BML Fellowships in the History of Medicine at the Countway provide stipends of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020. Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and may be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library.

Engraving of an apothecary in Das Buch der Cirurgia (Strassburg, 4 July 1497). Boston Medical Library Rare Books Collection (Ballard 233).

The collections of the Center for the History of Medicine enable researchers to contextualize, understand, and contribute to the history of human health care, scientific medical development, and public health; they eflect nearly every medical and public health discipline, including anatomy, anesthesiology, cardiology, dentistry, internal medicine, medical jurisprudence, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, pharmacy and pharmacology, psychiatry and psychology, and surgery, as well as variety of popular medicine topics and public health subjects such as industrial hygiene, nutrition, and tropical medicine. The Center serves as the institutional archives for the Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Harvard School of Public Health, and is home to the Warren Anatomical Museum, which includes anatomical artifacts, pathological specimens, instruments, and other objects. Through the Center, researchers have the opportunity to use the rich historical resources of both the Harvard Medical Library and Boston Medical Library. For more information, visit https://www.countway.harvard.edu/center-history-medicine/collections.

Fellowship proposals (no more than 5 pages) should describe the research project and demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic.

Applications should include:

  • CV
  • Length of visit
  • Proposed budget and budget breakdown (travel, lodging, incidentals)
  • Two letters of recommendation are also required

Application deadline is Friday, March 29th.

Electronic submissions of materials may be sent to: chm@hms.harvard.edu

Boston Medical Library Fellowships
Center for the History of Medicine
Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
10 Shattuck Street
Boston, MA 02115.

Please see our website for more information and details about previous research recipients. Awards will be announced in early May.

Apply now for a 2019-2020 New England Regional Fellowship!

By , December 7, 2018

The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC) is now accepting applications for 2019-2020 research grants.

NERFC is a collaboration of twenty-seven major cultural agencies that will offer at least twenty awards in 2019–2020. Each grant provides a stipend of $5,000 for a total of at least eight weeks of research at three or more participating institutions beginning June 1, 2019, and ending May 31, 2020. The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine and its Center for the History of Medicine is a NERFC member.

NERFC will also make a special award in 2019–2020 on behalf of the The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, which will underwrite a project on the history of New England before the American Revolution.

All applications must be completed using our online form at www.nerfc.org/apply.

The deadline for applications is February 1, 2019.

Contact the Massachusetts Historical Society, by phone at 617-646-0577 or email fellowships@masshist.org, with questions. Download the poster or visit the NERFC website for a full list of participating member institutions.

 

Speakers Announced for 2018 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

By , October 11, 2018

The Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and
the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
are pleased to present

The 2018 COLLOQUIUM ON THE HISTORY OF PSYCHIATRY AND MEDICINE
David G. Satin, M.D., DLFAPA Director

Open to students of history and those valuing a historical perspective on their professions.

All presentations are from
4:00 P.M.—5:30 P.M.
In the Lahey Room, fifth floor, Countway Library of Medicine

October 18
Emotionally Disturbed: The Care and Abandonment of America’s Troubled Children in the Twentieth Century, Deborah Doroshow, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Fellow in Medical Oncology and Academic Affiliate in the History of Medicine, Yale University

November 8
History of the Boston University School of Medicine: A Journey for Social Justice, Douglas H. Hughes, M.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Ramsey Professor of Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine

December 20
Psychiatry in Revolution: Cuba 1959-1970, Jennifer Lambe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of History, Brown University

Registration is not required.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032
e-mail: david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

Register Now! Constructing Livable Lives: A Celebration of the Archiving of the Leston Havens Teaching Website

By , October 11, 2018

Join the Center for the History of Medicine in celebrating the archiving of “Constructing Livable Lives,” a free and active teaching website that brings together for the first time the teaching lectures, books, papers, videos, and audio recordings of American psychiatrist, psychotherapist, and prolific author Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011), Professor Emeritus, Harvard University. Speakers will address the impact of Dr. Havens’ work on medical education and psychiatry, as well as illustrate Dr. Havens’ commitment to using the history of psychiatry to inform contemporary practice.

Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011)

Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011)

Program

4:00-4:30
Refreshments and light fare

4:30-4:40
Opening remarks, Dr. Scott H. Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

4:40-5:00
“What Leston Havens Taught Me About the History of Psychiatry,” Dr. Edward Hundert, Dean for Medical Education and the Daniel D. Federman, M.D. Professor in Residence of Global Health and Social Medicine and Medical Education at Harvard Medical School

5:00-5:20
“Havens’ Gifts to Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,” Dr. Alex Sabo, Psychiatrist, Berkshire Medical Center; co-author, The Real World Guide to Psychotherapy Practice

5:20-5:35
“Building the Leston Havens M.D. Teaching Site,” Dr. Susan Miller-Havens

5:35-5:45
“Exploring the Archived Website: Where to Go and What You’ll Find,” Emily R. Novak Gustainis, MLS, Deputy Director, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

5:45-6:00
Q&A with Dr. Hundert and Dr. Sabo

 

Registration is required. Visit https://libcal.library.harvard.edu/event/4705514 to register.

 

Register Now! Emerging Infections Then & Now

By , September 8, 2018

In partnership with the Harvard Global Health Initiative and Harvard Medical School’s Department of Global Health and Social Medicine the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, is pleased to announce the upcoming event

Emerging Infections Then & Now:
From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018 | 6:30pm – 9:00pm
Lahey Room, Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115

Registration is required.
Visit https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6KXIVkKTGWlsLZ3 to register.

PROGRAM

6:30pm – 6:45pm – Welcoming Remarks
Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine

Daniel LuceySenior Scholar, O’Neill Institute; Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Law, Georgetown University; Anthropology Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History


6:45pm – 8:15pm – Public Discussion – Emerging Infections Then & Now
Michele Barry, Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean of Global Health; Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford University

Ramanan Laxminarayan, Founder & Director, Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP); Senior Research Scholar & Lecturer, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University; Affiliate Professor, University of Washington; Visiting Professor, University of Kwazulu Natal

Eugene RichardsonAssistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Moderator: Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine


8:15pm – 8:20pm – Closing Remarks
Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine


8:20pm – 9:00pm – Exhibition Viewing

Selected items from Center for the History of Medicine historical collections related to the 1918 Influenza Pandemic will be on display

 

 

Registration open for History, Uses, and Future of the Nobel Prize symposium

By , September 7, 2018

The Center for the History of Medicine is excited to announce the forthcoming symposium, The History, Uses, and Future of the Nobel Prize, to be held at Harvard Medical School (HMS) on October 4, 2018 in the Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall, Harvard Medical School.

Co-sponsored by the Consulate General of Sweden, Heinrich-Heine University, the HMS Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, the HMS Ackerman Program on Medicine & Culture, and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, the program will bring together historians and Nobel laureates to consider the history of the Nobel Prize and its enduring social, political, and scientific roles. The event will feature three panels: “Scientific Credit and the History of the Nobel Prize,” “The Nobel – and Ig Nobel – Prize in Practice, and The Uses and Future of the Nobel Prize.” A complete list of speakers is available on the symposium’s Countway’s events calendar page.

The symposium was organized by Nils Hansson (Heinrich Heine-University), David S. Jones (Harvard Medical School and Harvard University), and Scott H. Podolsky (Harvard Medical School and Director of the Center for the History of Medicine).

Registration is required. Please visit https://libcal.library.harvard.edu/event/4583053 to register.

Center Staff Honored by Harvard Medical School

By , July 10, 2018

It is with great pride that two Center for the History of Medicine, Countway Library staff have been recognized by the Harvard Medical School community for their hard work during the 2017-2018 academic year.

Joan Ilacqua (left) and Libby Bouvier, one of the co-founders of The History Project

Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist, Archives for Women and Medicine, has received the Harvard Medical School 2018 Dean’s Community Service Staff Award for her work with “The History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston.” The award recognizes individuals whose dedication and commitment to community service have made an outstanding positive impact on the local and/or global community.

Dominic Hall accepting the Dean’s Leadership Award at the HMS Town Hall meeting on June 11

Dominic Hall, Curator, Warren Anatomical Museum, has received the 2018 Joseph B. Martin Dean’s Leadership Award for the Advancement of Women Staff.  Initiated in 1988, the yearly award recognizes a Harvard staff member who is committed to the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine. The award process is organized and coordinated by the Joint Committee on the Status of Women (JCSW) at HMS and HSDM.

The Center is grateful for their efforts, which support Medical Schoool’s commitment to convening and nurturing a diverse community of individuals dedicated to promoting excellence and leadership in medicine and science through education, research, clinical care and service.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy