Category: Staff News

Announcement: Archives for Diversity and Inclusion Program

By , November 6, 2018

Members of the Class of 1881 of the Harvard Dental School

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion. Building on the successes of the Archives for Women in Medicine program, the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion will expand in scope to include acquiring the research, teaching, and professional records of underrepresented faculty of Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and Harvard affiliated hospitals.

Joan Ilacqua is Archivist for Diversity and Inclusion at the Center for the History of Medicine. Ms. Ilacqua will partner with members of the HMS/HSDM community to diversify the historical record to include populations underrepresented in medicine (URM), including those who self identify as: Black or African-American; Hispanic or Latino; American Indian or Alaska Native; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander; Asian; LGBTQ; or as a person with a disability. As a part of the revamped program, she will also continue to acquire the records of leading women in medicine. In the next year, she will implement a strategic acquisitions program by identifying records, archives, publications, and other materials created by groups underrepresented in medicine (URM) professionals affiliated with Harvard with long-term research and evidential value. She also plans robust outreach activities, including engaging an advisory committee and community partnerships, and capturing and sharing the experiences of URM faculty through exhibits, events, and oral histories. Ms. Ilacqua has already conducted oral history interviews with a number of faculty and alumni as part of the Equal Access Oral History Project

Formerly, Ms. Ilacqua was the Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine where she worked to ensure that the history of women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences were recognized in the Center for the History of Medicine’s collections. She serves on Harvard Medical School’s LGBT Advisory Committee, Equity and Social Justice Committee, and Joint Committee on the Status of Women. She won the 2018 Dean’s Community Service Award for her volunteer work with The History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston, a volunteer-driven community LGBTQ archives. A graduate of UMass Boston’s Public History master’s program, Ms. Ilacqua is currently enrolled in Harvard extension school’s Nonprofit Management certificate program.

The Center thanks the Office for Diversity Inclusion & Community Partnership, the Joint Committee on the Status of Women, the LGBT Advisory Committee, and the Office for Faculty Affairs for their support of the Archives for Women in Medicine program and the creation of the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion.

Center Staff Honored by Harvard Medical School

By , July 10, 2018

It is with great pride that two Center for the History of Medicine, Countway Library staff have been recognized by the Harvard Medical School community for their hard work during the 2017-2018 academic year.

Joan Ilacqua (left) and Libby Bouvier, one of the co-founders of The History Project

Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist, Archives for Women and Medicine, has received the Harvard Medical School 2018 Dean’s Community Service Staff Award for her work with “The History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston.” The award recognizes individuals whose dedication and commitment to community service have made an outstanding positive impact on the local and/or global community.

Dominic Hall accepting the Dean’s Leadership Award at the HMS Town Hall meeting on June 11

Dominic Hall, Curator, Warren Anatomical Museum, has received the 2018 Joseph B. Martin Dean’s Leadership Award for the Advancement of Women Staff.  Initiated in 1988, the yearly award recognizes a Harvard staff member who is committed to the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine. The award process is organized and coordinated by the Joint Committee on the Status of Women (JCSW) at HMS and HSDM.

The Center is grateful for their efforts, which support Medical Schoool’s commitment to convening and nurturing a diverse community of individuals dedicated to promoting excellence and leadership in medicine and science through education, research, clinical care and service.

Center Receives S.T. Lee Innovation Grant

By , July 10, 2018

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that it has received S.T. Lee Innovation Grant funding for its 2018 proposal, “Beyond the Beyond Box.” The application was one of nineteen proposals to bring together Harvard faculty members and library staff; of the nineteen, only six projects were funded. Dominic Hall, Curator, Warren Anatomical Museum, will be spearheading the initiative in partnership with Professor Anne Harrington, Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science.

Plaster head cast made of Phineas Gage by Henry Jacob Bigelow at Harvard Medical School in 1850 to substantiate the specifics of Gage’s neurotrauma

“Beyond the Bone Box” was inspired by Harvard Medical School’s retired bone box program, which enabled medical students to borrow sets of human bones for home study, and developed in partnership with Harvard faculty, curators, archivists, and librarians, this project will develop three circulating resources that contain 3D-printed copies of Warren Anatomical Museum specimens highly contextualized by surrogates of special collections materials. Through this project, the Center seeks to democratize access to unique and sensitive collections through quality fungible surrogates and engender new forms of engagement with Harvard’s special collections across its library system.

The first circulating resource will be a teaching kit built around the case of Phineas Gage, the 19th century railroad foreman whose prefrontal cortex injury has been used to academically and popularly illustrate post-traumatic social disinhibition for the last 150 years.

Project work will begin in September. For the complete list of Lee Innovation Grant award recipients, click here.

Simmons Intern Processes the Elinor Kamath Papers

By , June 18, 2018
Charlotte Lellman, Simmons Processing Intern (Spring 2018). Charlotte processed the Elinor Kamath papers.

Charlotte Lellman, Simmons Processing Intern (Spring 2018). Charlotte processed the Elinor Kamath papers.

This is a guest post from our latest Simmons College intern, Charlotte Lellman, who recently processed the Elinor Kamath papers.

Over the past four months, my last semester as a student at Simmons School of Library and Information Science, I had the opportunity to intern at the Center for the History of

Medicine. During my time at the Center, I processed the Elinor Kamath papers under the supervision of Amber LaFountain. When I arrived, not much was known about Kamath or her records, but as I practiced my classroom knowledge on real records, I also got to know more about Kamath’s life and work.

Elinor Kamath (1915-1992) was a researcher at Stanford Medical School’s Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, and her major research focus was the events known as the “thalidomide crisis” or “thalidomide disaster.” The thalidomide crisis began in the 1950s and 1960s, when pregnant women with symptoms of morning sickness were treated with thalidomide. Many of these women gave birth to children with significant congenital conditions, such as absence of arms or legs. The people who had congenital conditions from thalidomide grew up to call themselves “thalidomiders,” and many continue advocacy for compensation and justice from pharmaceutical companies, particularly in countries outside the United States, such as Canada and England. In addition to learning a lot about the tragic injustices of the thalidomide crisis, I learned a lot about Kamath from studying the records she left. I discovered scraps of handwritten poetry written to her female colleagues in a male-dominated workplace; I discovered her tidy budgeting records, a necessity for reimbursement in the paper-based era; and I saw how her drive to document the thalidomide crisis forced her to self-advocate for research funding, which was often unstable.

Kamath’s records were my opportunity to practice each step of archival processing: surveying, refoldering, box listing, preservation photocopying, describing, and cataloging the collection. Throughout the process, I benefitted from the Center’s efficient and well-established protocols and templates, as well as the staff’s archival experience.

The Center for the History of Medicine is now pleased to announce the opening of the Elinor Kamath papers, 1838-1987 (inclusive), 1956-1984 (bulk). The papers, 1838-1987 (inclusive), 1956-1984 (bulk), were generated through Kamath’s many years of studying the events known as the “thalidomide crisis” or “thalidomide disaster.” Kamath’s research included correspondence with Widukind Lenz and William McBride, two doctors who were the first to recognize the connection between thalidomide and congenital conditions, as well as many other doctors, researchers, and pharmaceutical businesspeople. The papers represent Kamath’s research on legal cases in which a thalidomider or a family member brought litigation against a pharmaceutical company that distributed a thalidomide drug. The collection also includes papers from Kamath’s work as a journalist and translator, and a manuscript draft of Kamath’s unpublished book, Echo of Silence: The Causes and Consequences of the Thalidomide Disaster.

Processing a manuscript collection at the Center for the History of Medicine gave me a context in which to consider the implications of my archival decisions. With Amber, I discussed questions of terminology, provenance, arrangement, all of which were significant to how researchers will use and understand the Elinor Kamath papers.

The finding aid for the Kamath papers can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

Partners in Health documentary Bending the Arc opens in Boston

By , October 17, 2017
From left to right: Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, Dr. Paul Farmer, and Bending the Arc Arc writer Cori Shepherd Stern, at the Coolidge Corner Theater, October 11, 2017. Photograph courtesy Dan Phipps.

From left to right: Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, Dr. Paul Farmer, and Bending the Arc writer and producer Cori Shepherd Stern, at the Coolidge Corner Theater, October 11, 2017. Photograph courtesy Dan Phipps.

Bending the Arc, the story of Partners in Health physicians, founders, and humanitarians Ophelia Dahl, Paul Farmer, and Jim Yong Kim, is garnering critical kudos from The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, Salon, and a host of others, not to mention being an official selection for nine major film festivals. But as any documentary filmmaker will tell you, stories of this kind don’t make it to the screen without substantial support from archivists and researchers. In Bending the Arc’s case, that support came from Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist Jessica Murphy, who helped the filmmakers identify records (including video) for the film from the Center’s Partners in Health organizational records, 1990-2006, and Paul Farmer papers, 1990-2009. On October 11, Bending the Arc celebrated its opening night at the Coolidge Corner Theater with a screening and a reception. During the post-screening panel, Kief Davidson (director/producer), Cori Shepherd Stern (writer/producer), and Paul Farmer personally thanked Jess, making her stand up so everyone could applaud for her. The Center congratulates Jess on the well-deserved acknowledgement! More information about the film is available here.

Center Staff Presents On EAC-CPF Project At Digital Humanities Open Office Hours

By , April 21, 2017

eac-cpftemplate2Center for the History of Medicine processing assistant, Betts Coup, recently completed a project related to the implementation of the archival standard, Encoded Archival Context – Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAD-CPF) as part of her final semester in the Simmons College School of Library and Information Science master’s program. The project centered on the creators of archival collections within the scope of a Boston School desegregation effort at Northeastern University, while Betts simultaneously led the development of an EAC-CPF template for the Center for the History of Medicine, working closely with the Center’s Collections Services Archivist, Jessica Sedgwick. The efforts to work with this standard at both institutions allowed for collaboration and critical considerations about what data elements should be included in a template for the Center’s collections.

As part of the project, Betts presented about the creation of EAC-CPF templates for both institutions at the Northeastern University Digital Humanities Working Group Open Office Hours, a regular meeting where members of the digital humanities community come together to present and discuss current trends and projects. She was joined for this presentation by Katherine Wisser, an Associate Professor at Simmons College, the advisor for the project, and also the co-chair for the Technical subcommittee for EAC-CPF. The discussion at the Open Office Hours included a description of the standard, as most members of the audience were not familiar with it, a walk-through of the ways EAC-CPF records describe entities, and a comparison of EAC-CPF to TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) Personographies.

EAC-CPF is a standard that was developed fairly recently to provide a method for describing the entities that create, or are the subject of, archival or bibliographic resources. Those entities can be individual persons, corporate bodies, or families, and each record describes one entity and its relationships to other entities and resources. In many ways, EAC-CPF looks similar to the finding aids that describe the Center’s collections, and can include portions of descriptive information borrowed directly from those finding aids, including biographical or historical notes that specifically describe the creating entity rather than the resources themselves. However, EAC-CPF records additionally include elements specific to the description of the entities, including occupations or functions terms, rather than subject terms, as well as an entire section regarding relationships.

The relations portion of the record describes the relationships between the entity and other entities, such as family members, coworkers, and institutions where a person was employed or educated, among others. There are a total of nine types of relationships that can be described, including identity, hierarchical, hierarchical-parent, hierarchical-child, temporal, temporal-earlier, temporal-later, family, and associative. Because many of the Center’s collections, and thus the creators or subjects of those collections, relate to professional careers in medicine, science, public health, dentistry, and similar topics, the vast majority of relationships found in EAC-CPF records are best described as associative. They are then defined in a descriptive note so that users may fully understand the relationship between the entities.

EAC-CPF records additionally describe the relationships between entities and resources. These relationships are defined by three attributes: subject of, creator of, or other, for non-specific relationships. For the Center, many of the resource relations described include the entity’s relationship specifically to archival resources in the collection, either as creator or subject. The relations portion of an EAC-CPF record allows connections to be made between the people or organizations which are responsible for or are the subjects of archival resources, and in turn will enable users to make new connections.

Betts’ presentation at Northeastern University’s Digital Humanities Open Office Hours gave attendees the chance to learn about EAC-CPF and how it is being applied both at the Center for the History of Medicine and the Northeastern University Archives & Special Collections. The discussion also related to TEI Personographies, which is a standard that organizes biographical information about writers, authors, and subjects into encoded texts. TEI personographies are being implemented at Northeastern as part of the Women Writers’ Project, and have some similarities to EAC-CPF in terms of content, but are less structured and defined. The conversation demonstrated the challenges of finding ways to encode and share information that might improve access to resources, and the ways both these standards provide connections and additional information that may improve paths to accessing materials.

Currently, working with the processing staff at the Center, Betts Coup and Jessica Sedgwick are in the final stages of implementing the EAC-CPF template developed over the fall of 2016. In time, these records will be made available to the public with the goal of enabling users to discover new connections between entities and archival resources.

Center Archivist to attend Archives Leadership Institute

By , February 16, 2017

img_20170215_084242The Center for the History of Medicine is thrilled to announce that Jessica Sedgwick, the Center’s Collections Services Archivist, has been accepted into the 2017 cohort of the Archives Leadership Institute (ALI). ALI, which is funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), is a dynamic program that provides advanced leadership training and mentorship for 25 innovative archival leaders annually, equipping them with the knowledge and tools to transform the profession in practice, theory, and attitude.  Applicants to this competitive program are chosen for their exceptional leadership skills and potential, ability to influence change within the archival field, strong commitment to the archival profession, demonstrated professional organizational involvement and service, collaborative and innovative spirit, and representation and/or support of diversity within the profession. As part of the program, participants design a practicum to be implemented at their home institution. ALI will be held at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky, June 25 – July 1, 2017.

As Collections Services Archivist, Jessica leads an innovative program for establishing physical and intellectual control over the Center’s internationally renowned holdings, from accession through final processing and description.  Jessica has a broad range of experience in the archival field, having worked previously in reference and instruction, outreach, digitization and metadata, born-digital collections management, acquisitions and collection development, and fundraising and grant planning. Prior positions include Metadata Project Manager for the Boston Library Consortium, Associate Archivist for Reference and Digital Collections at the Moakley Archive and Institute, Archivist for Women in Medicine at the Center for the History of Medicine, and Manuscripts Processor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Southern Historical Collection. Jessica earned her MLS at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2008 and is an active member of New England Archivists, most recently serving on the executive board and volunteering with the Mentoring Program. Jessica has taught as an adjunct faculty member at the Simmons College School of Library of Information and Library Science since 2011.

We know Jessica is looking forward to developing new skills, knowledge, and connections that will enable her to further advance the Center’s mission; we wish her the best of luck in Berea!

Center archivist inspires “featured scientist” in STEM publication for children

By , November 15, 2016

 

https://custemized.org/MyScientificName/L

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Archivist (and Library Scientist) Heather Mumford

The Center for the History of Medicine is delighted to announce that its Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Archivist, Heather Mumford, is one of the 26 inspiring women in STEM occupations who participated in the creation of Jean Fan’s most recent CuSTEMized’s book, My Scientific Name. CuSTEMized is a not-for-profit initiative that provides personalized STEM-related motivational storybooks, posters, and other media products to encourage kids, in particular girls, in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). For “My Scientific Name,” Jean identified a STEM career for every letter in the alphabet, hence “L is for Library Scientist”!

Jean and Heather spent time discussing what a “library scientist” does, and came up with a second-grader-approved poem that succinctly sums up that work. To read the poem, visit Mumford’s featured page on the website: https://custemized.org/MyScientificName/L.

You can try out (and then download) a personalized book for free. Enjoy!

Deputy Director Awarded Joseph B. Martin Dean’s Leadership Award for the Advancement of Women Staff

By , June 27, 2016

On June 2, 2016, the Center’s Deputy Director, Emily R. Novak Gustainis, was awarded the Joseph B. Martin Dean’s Leadership Award for the Advancement of Women Staff. The Dean’s award, initiated by and named for former HMS Dean Joseph B. Martin, recognizes Harvard faculty and staff members committed to the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine. It is co-sponsored by the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and the Joint Committee on the Status of Women and is awarded annually.

Emily Novak Gustainis

Novak Gustainis

Emily, who joined the Center for the History of Medicine in 2009, was recently named Deputy Director of the Center. She serves in a senior management role and is responsible for the care and curation of the Center’s collections of rare books, manuscripts, archives, the Warren Anatomical Museum, and special collections. Emily was nominated for the Dean’s award by several of her colleagues, who recognized her for her leadership, mentorship, and for fostering an environment that recruits, retains, develops, supports, and advances women staff.

At the award ceremony, Dean Jeffrey S. Flier introduced and read excerpts from nomination letters for the award:

“As a mentor, supervisor, and colleague, Emily provides encouragement and inspiration directly through her attitudes and actions.”

“As a manager, she ensures that staff members are given ample opportunities to develop as professionals and fulfill career and educational goals. She inspires confidence and independence in her employees and encourages us to seek out opportunities for growth. Within her department, Ms. Novak Gustainis fosters a community of support, creativity, and openness for her female employees, and works to ensure that her staff members are able to enjoy a high quality of both professional and personal life.”

“Ms. Novak Gustainis has consistently been involved with the recruitment, retention, and promotion of high quality women staff members.  She actively seeks out opportunities and funding to retain women staff members, either in their current positions or through promotion to more advanced roles. … Moreover, she has overseen the promotion of multiple women staff members from part-time to full-time or temporary to permanent roles.”

Emily graciously accepted the award, and in her acceptance speech, expounded upon the merits of having a mentor like Kathryn Hammond Baker who supported her throughout her career.

“Kathryn was the kind of person who believed that anything was possible, and her belief in me transformed my perspective on my career as an archivist. When I became a parent, she offered me the flexibility one could only hope for as a working mother. And as a friend, she embodied strength and hope in the face of the inevitable.   If I can somehow pass at least some of this on, to make how we work better, I will consider myself a success.”

We hope you join all of us at the Center in congratulating Emily!

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