Category: Archives and Records Management

Center archivist inspires “featured scientist” in STEM publication for children

By , November 15, 2016

 

https://custemized.org/MyScientificName/L

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Archivist (and Library Scientist) Heather Mumford

The Center for the History of Medicine is delighted to announce that its Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health Archivist, Heather Mumford, is one of the 26 inspiring women in STEM occupations who participated in the creation of Jean Fan’s most recent CuSTEMized’s book, My Scientific Name. CuSTEMized is a not-for-profit initiative that provides personalized STEM-related motivational storybooks, posters, and other media products to encourage kids, in particular girls, in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). For “My Scientific Name,” Jean identified a STEM career for every letter in the alphabet, hence “L is for Library Scientist”!

Jean and Heather spent time discussing what a “library scientist” does, and came up with a second-grader-approved poem that succinctly sums up that work. To read the poem, visit Mumford’s featured page on the website: https://custemized.org/MyScientificName/L.

You can try out (and then download) a personalized book for free. Enjoy!

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Records Management Workshops

By , March 16, 2016

This spring, the Archives and Records Management program will be hosting a series of workshops to help you manage the records of your office. All workshops are free and open to members of the HMS/HSDM community.

For more information or to arrange for in-department seminars, visit our website, call the Archives and Records Management program at 617-432-6193, or email arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Introduction to the General Records Schedule

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Do you know how long you need to keep your office records, and what you should do when you no longer need them? In this workshop, we’ll help de-mystify records retention by showing you how to use and understand the Harvard University General Records Schedule (GRS). We’ll give you all the information you need to:

  • Identify your records using the GRS
  • Determine how long to keep your records
  • Decide if records should be destroyed or archived
  • Know who to contact if the GRS doesn’t describe your records

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Managing Your Paper Records: Off-Site Records Storage

Wednesday, March 16, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Run out of room for files in your office that you need to keep? The Harvard Depository records center is the perfect place for your office, department, or lab to store records that you need to keep but don’t use every day. In this workshop, we’ll review step-by-step instructions for:

  • How to set up an account
  • How to pack and label boxes correctly
  • How to complete transfer paperwork
  • How to recall records back to your office

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Familiarity with the General Records Schedule (GRS) is helpful but not required. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Managing Your Electronic Records: Shared Drives & Email

Wednesday, May 4, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Does it take ages to find a file in your shared drive? Are you running out of room in your email box? Save yourself and your office time and money by learning to manage your electronic records. In this workshop, we’ll help you manage your email and electronic records efficiently and effectively by giving you guidelines for:

  • Naming and organizing your files for fast and easy access
  • Developing a file plan for your office shared drive
  • Determining which emails you should keep, and how to store them
  • Learning how to keep your digital records in compliance with Harvard’s records management policies

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Familiarity with the General Records Schedule (GRS) is helpful but not required. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Project Archivist Presents at New England Regional Meeting of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance

By , October 8, 2015
3rd Annual New England Regional Meeting of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance, held at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, 25 September 2015.

3rd Annual New England Regional Meeting of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance.

On Friday, September 25, Project Archivist Amber LaFountain attended the 3rd Annual New England Regional Meeting of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance, held at the Dartmouth campus of the University of Massachusetts.  The meeting allowed attendees to highlight their institutions’ current digital stewardship work, and provided opportunities for collaborative learning and brainstorming.

The first half of the program was dedicated to short presentations, during which archivists, librarians, and information professionals representing a number of New England institutions shared their current digital initiatives.  Amber presented to the group on the Center’s Bridging the Research Data Divide project, a CLIR-funded collaboration with the University of Alberta Libraries that began in June 2015.  She discussed the CLIR partners’ plans for exposing descriptive metadata about the project’s research data collections through the Dataverse, and for developing best practices for describing research data collections to enable long-term access, use, and repurposing of the data.

Later in the program, attendees broke into informal unconference groups to discuss various digital stewardship topics and concerns.  Amber was able to collaborate with other local archivists and librarians to brainstorm ideas for data wrangling (preparing digital assets for long-term preservation and use) and for creating preservation metadata for digital collections.  Other unconference topics included: issues with saving digital assets in proprietary software and databases; implementing practical preservation practices; file integrity verification; and repositories for access versus preservation.

The meeting was a fantastic learning opportunity, and we’re excited to follow the progress of our local colleagues’ projects over the coming year.

The Bridging the Research Data Divide project is funded by a Hidden Collections Grant administered by the Council on Library Resources (CLIR). For more information on the project, please contact the project’s principal investigator, Emily R. Novak Gustainis, Head, Collections Services.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

“Big Data” Stewardship

By , September 29, 2015

BigData_2267x1146_whiteOn Tuesday, September 8th, 2015, Heather Mumford, Archivist for the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, attended the webinar, The Data Flood: Implications for data stewardship and the culture of discovery. The discussion was led by Dr. Margaret Leinen, Director, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, Vice Chancellor for Marine Sciences, and Dean, School of Marine Sciences, University of California San Diego. Although Dr. Leinen’s background is in geoscience, the merit of her key talking points– using data with intelligence and interoperability—crosses disciplines.

 

Storage and Management

Managing big data is important because observation is the first step towards understanding. We need to address how we are managing big data because, well, it’s big–and only getting bigger! According to the ACI Information Group, five exabytes of content were created between the birth of the world and 2003, and since then five exabytes have been created on a daily basis. Data growth is poised to exceed Moore’s Law growth (average growth = 64%). This means our ability to store and explore data is challenged; automatically “archiving” data on external storage should no longer been seen as an adequate solution to such rapid exponential growth. One way to control growth is through appraisal. Researchers need assistance with understanding what should be kept and for how long.

 

It was particularly interesting to hear Dr. Leinin’s perspective on who should be responsible for stewarding big data. Many universities are struggling or unable to manage large data collections. Archives, which typically fall into a data stewardship role, are often under-funded and under-staffed–and at a time when data is growing in size and researchers’ expectation of services provided is expanding. Government data archives are already having difficulties in accommodating innovation in systems and structures, morphing to new technology, etc. In her presentation, Dr. Leinin made a call for a change in culture.

 

Publishing Data

Brooks Hanson, American Geophysical Union Director of Publications, was paraphrased as stating that publications are going to become more interactive for readers, and data will become an interoperable and seamless part of the publication. If a researcher publishes, he or she must be able to offer that data to the community. The data should also be open so that it can be replicated, and future progress can be made from this same set of data. Social media (bookmarking, tagging, etc.) is not a complete solution for sharing data, as not all social media is interoperable or open source. How do we have discussions about data in a way that makes it interoperable and accessible to others?

 

Data Management Education

It is generally understood that the “next generation” is poised to be more fluent with social media tools, but are we also simultaneously educating them in data? Big data management is still in its earliest stages, so it will be interesting to see how data management education will be tackled by the scholarly community. There is certainly an opportunity for data science to emerge as an exciting new undergraduate major, master’s degree, and certificate program (for professionals already in the field).  State and federal agencies are already pursuing certificate programs for current employees who have found themselves working with large data sets.

 

This webinar was presented by DataOne. In addition to archived webinars, additional lessons and tutorials are available online for use/distribution. Please visit http://www.dataone.org for more information.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Archivists attend launch of “Women and Health: the key to sustainable development”

By , June 23, 2015

Heather Mumford, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Archivist, and Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine, recently attended the launch of The Lancet’s report “Women and Health: the key for sustainable development,” at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The report was created by the 15-member Commission on Women and Health, a partnership between The Lancet, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Women and Health Initiative, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

Archivists Joan Ilacqua and Heather Mumford with a copy of The Lancet's report "Women and Health: the key for sustainable development.”

Archivists Joan Ilacqua and Heather Mumford with a copy of The Lancet’s report “Women and Health: the key for sustainable development.”

The launch featured comments by several Harvard experts including: Julio Frenk, Dean of the School of Public Health, Ana Langer, Professor of Public Health and Coordinator of the Dean’s Special Initiative on Women and Health, Paula A. Johnson, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Women’s Health and Gender at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Felicia Knaul, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Harvard Global Equity Initiative, and Jeni Klugman, lecturer at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Other speakers included Afaf Meleis of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Ruth Bonita of the University of Auckland, Justine Davies of The Lancet, and Mariam Claeson of The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Speakers emphasized that gender inequality continues to be a global problem; this inequality inhibits progress and potential for a variety of stakeholders on a global scale. Health inequities manifest in many ways. For example, addressing women’s health has historically been reduced to reproductive health, while poverty, urbanization, non-communicable diseases and chronic disease disproportionately affect women. Furthermore, women are not solely consumers of health, but are also health providers, often with little to no training, compensation, or recognition. Although women are represented in the workforce, medical professions, and academia, the demand for women to provide domestic work and care outside of their employment to family members has not changed and effectively convolutes a work-life balance.

Gender inequality disenfranchises women, even in wealthy countries. Marginalization and inequity is present in politics, higher education, and other fields. The report concludes that all sustainability goals should be gender-specific and measurable, and that gender equity committees (such as Harvard Medical School’s own Joint Committee on the Status of Women) continue to be necessary to prevent and combat marginalization. Addressing women and health, acknowledging and compensating women as consumers and deliverers of healthcare, and investing in all stages of women’s health throughout life will benefit global economies at large.

The conclusions of the report were underscored by the speakers’ dedication to interdisciplinary work to solve medical, scientific, public health, and economic problems, a mission integral to the Center’s own acquisitions guidelines. We are committed to acquiring, preserving, and making available historic materials to provide context and perspective to the history of medicine, including documenting the developments, experiences, and contributions of public health pioneers and women leaders in medicine. As archivists, we aspire to be responsible and informed stewards of our historic collections, so attending events like this launch are necessary to understanding the contemporary contexts of our collections.

Women and Health: the key for sustainable development” is available to read online at The Lancet’s website.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Welcome to our new Records Management Assistant!

By , January 9, 2015

Andra Langoussis, Records Management AssistantMy name is Andra Langoussis, and I am happy to be starting a new role as the Records Management Assistant here at the Center for the History of Medicine. As a recent graduate of Simmons School of Library and Information Science and as a part-time employee here at the Center for the last two years, I am very excited about this new opportunity!

I have worn several hats over the last two years here at the Center. I began as an intern during my second semester of graduate school, and since then I have been busy working on processing projects (including the Bigelow-Wallis and Warren-Kaula Teaching Watercolors), migrating the Center’s past exhibits and other digitized collections into OnView, helping patrons with reference requests, and coordinating events.

I look forward to meeting and working more closely with the faculty and staff here at Harvard University. Thank you for your welcome and support as I learn the ropes of my new position!

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Jonathan Beckwith Papers Processing is Underway, as part of Access to Activism Project

By , December 11, 2014
Lecture poster for Jonathan Beckwith's talk on "Genetics and Social Policy: the XYY and Sociobiology Controversies," 28 April 1976.

Lecture poster for Jonathan Beckwith’s talk on “Genetics and Social Policy: the XYY and Sociobiology Controversies,” 28 April 1976, H MS c370. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

In 1969, Jonathan Beckwith and fellow researchers, James Shapiro and Lawrence J. Eron, successfully isolated a gene from a bacterial chromosome.  After considering both the potential positive and negative social implications of his genetics research, he began a lifetime of social activism, advocating for civil rights and social responsibility in science and genetics.  The Center is pleased to report that the Jonathan Beckwith papers (1969-2009), a product of Beckwith’s professional activities, social activism, and genetics research, are currently being processed as a part of the Access to Activism project.

Beckwith (born 1935) is the American Cancer Society Research Professor at Harvard Medical School.  His research has focused primarily on bacterial genetics and microbiology, including disulfide bonds, membrane protein structure and function, gene expression, the lac operon, the mechanism of protein secretion, and cell division.  As a social activist, he has served as: a member of the National Institutes of Health’s and U.S. Department of Energy’s Working Group on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project (ELSI); President of the Board of Directors for Science for the People; and a member of Science for the People’s study groups on genetic screening and sociobiology.  He has also received a number of awards and honors, including: the 1993 Genetics Society of America Medal; the 2005 Abbott Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Society for Microbiology; and the 2009 Selman Waksman Award in Microbiology from the National Academy of Sciences.  The papers, created through Beckwith’s professional, research, publishing, and social activism activities, include professional appointments and teaching records, writings and publications, public speaking records, professional association membership and committee records, research records, and collected publications.  They are expected to be open to research in 2015.

The Access to Activism project is funded by a Hidden Collections grant from the Harvard University Libraries.  In addition to the Jonathan Beckwith papers, the project will also open the collections of other physicians of social conscience: the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War records, 1957-1989 (inclusive), 1980-1987 (bulk); and the Sanford Gifford papers, 1956-1986 (inclusive).  For more information on the project, please contact Emily R. Novak Gustainis, Head, Collections Services.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Harvard Medical School Launches Submission and Archiving of Electronic Student Theses

By , October 28, 2014
ETD

Students logging into ETDs @ Harvard are met with a school specific submission tool. Each submission is estimated to take no more than ten minutes to complete.

The Center for the History of Medicine is excited to be a part of Harvard University’s launch of a new electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) submission system: ETDs @ Harvard. Bringing together stakeholders from across the Longwood Schools, the Countway Library, and the Harvard Libraries Office of Scholarly Communication (OSC), the project has been over a year in planning and will allow students to submit and archive their scholarly work electronically. The project also aims to bring a new level of visibility and access to student work, through the submission of theses into the DASH repository.

From the OSC’s Open Access Week announcement on October 16th: “The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication is pleased to use the occasion of Open Access Week to celebrate the adoption of Harvard’s new electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) submission system: ETDs @ Harvard. The Harvard Medical School (HMS) was the first Harvard school to launch the system, in January 2014. It deposited 20 doctoral dissertations in DASH, Harvard’s open-access repository, and listed them in HOLLIS+, Harvard Library’s new catalog. Since the collection of HMS dissertations went live in DASH in July, these works have been downloaded over 400 times.

As Stephen Volante, HMS Honors Program Coordinator notes, “When I took over [this role] in January 2013, successful students earned an academic distinction and bound copies of their theses went to Countway. There was no evidence of interest in theses beyond each student’s small professional network. [Our program’s] ETDs @ Harvard implementation in 2014 resulted in a collection of 20 theses in DASH that has, in less than three months, generated over 800 previews and 400 downloads. We can now demonstrate to students that by earning Honors, they are not just collecting more recognition. They are making active, substantial contributions to their fields that other physicians and researchers will seek out, study, and value.” A second HMS program, Master of Medical Sciences in Global Health Delivery, is currently submitting student work through the tool.

This fall, six more schools will roll out their own instances of ETDs @ Harvard: the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Graduate School of Design, Graduate School of Education, Harvard Business School, Harvard Divinity School, and Harvard School of Public Health. Three more will follow suit shortly thereafter.

Getting to this point required the collaboration of these schools with one another, and with other stakeholders across campus, such as the Office of General Counsel, Office for Scholarly Communication, Office of Technology Development, Student Billing, Registrars, program administrators, librarians, archivists, and students. Thanks to cooperation from every quarter, Harvard now has a University-wide open-source ETD submission system with the efficiency of central support and the flexibility of school-level customization.

Submitting a dissertation now takes a student just 10 minutes. In the process, students supply some metadata about their work, some contact information for themselves, and a copy of the final text. At the same time, they have the opportunity to submit an ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) and sign Harvard’s license agreement, granting the University a non-exclusive license to preserve, reproduce, and display the work.

Most importantly, these dissertations become open access, enlarging the authors’ audience and increasing their impact.

Garth McCavana, Dean of Student Affairs for the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) notes “GSAS students have been submitting their dissertations electronically since 2011 through a tool developed by ProQuest. We were initially cautious of moving our students to a new system, but the Office of Scholarly Communication has made the transition seamless.” He continued that “the new ETDs @ Harvard tool is extremely user-friendly and explains students’ options in a very clear manner. We think that ETDs @ Harvard will allow our students to weigh all the benefits of open access and allow them to promote their research widely.”

OSC Director Peter Suber welcomed the roll-out of ETDs @ Harvard. “Open access removes the cloak of invisibility from this very useful form of research literature. Opening up this work serves readers working on related topics, and serves authors seeking the widest possible audience. Making open access the default, subject to some exceptions and embargoes, is a modern realization of Harvard’s pre-digital policy to make dissertations available to the public, and not to grant degrees for contributions to knowledge that are kept secret.”

The OSC is delighted with the success of ETDs @ Harvard, and looks forward to its further spread across Harvard, helping to realize the vision of One Harvard.”

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

September 18: Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India, 1870-1910

By , September 8, 2014

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

 

Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India, 1870-1910

Kieran Fitzpatrick: D.Phil candidate at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford, and Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Studentship holder 2013-2016

The first in a series of four lectures given as the 2014 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

September 18, 2014
4:00-5:30 PM

Ballard Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Panorama Theme by Themocracy