Category: Fellows

2017-2018 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Applications Open

By , February 15, 2017

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Research Fellowship

Deadline May 15, 2017

Details

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine is pleased to provide one $5,000 grant to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible research period between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018. Foundation Fellowships are offered for research related to the history of women to be conducted at the Center for the History of Medicine at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. Preference will be given to:

  • projects that engage specifically with the history of women physicians, other health workers or medical scientists; however, proposals on the history of women’s health issues will also be considered
  • those who are using collections from the Center’s Archives for Women in Medicine, but research on the topic of women in medicine using other material from the Countway Library will be considered
  • applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway; however, all are encouraged to apply, including graduate students

In return, the Foundation requests a one page report on the Fellow’s research experience; a copy of the final product (with the ability to post excerpts from the paper/project); and a photo and bio of the Fellow for web and newsletter announcements. The Fellow will also be asked to present a lecture at the Countway Library.

Application Requirements

Applicants should submit a proposal (no more than five pages) outlining the subject and objectives of the research project, length of residence, historical materials to be used, and a project budget (including travel, lodging, and research expenses), along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendations by May 15, 2017. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic.

Applications should be sent to: The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship, Archives for Women in Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials and any questions may be directed to chm@hms.harvard.edu or (617) 432-2170.

 

Partnering Organizations

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine, soon to be the Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation, was founded with the strong belief that understanding our history plays a powerful role in shaping our future. The resolute stand women took to establish their place in these fields propels our vision forward. We serve as stewards to the stories from the past, and take pride in sharing them with the women of today. Our mission is to preserve and promote the history of women in medicine and the medical sciences, and we look forward to connecting you to our collective legacy that will empower our future.

The Archives for Women in Medicine is a program of the Countway Library’s Center for the History of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. The Archives for Women in Medicine actively acquires, processes, preserves, provides access to, and publicizes the papers of women physicians, researchers, and medical administrators. Learn more about collections open to research on our Archives for Women in Medicine Collections page.

Established in 1960 as a result of an alliance between the Boston Medical Library and the Harvard Medical Library, the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine is the largest academic medical library in the United States. The Countway Library maintains a collection of approximately 700,000 volumes. The Center for the History of Medicine’s collection of archives and manuscripts, numbering between 15-20 million items, is the largest collection of its kind in the United States. The manuscripts collection includes the personal and professional records of physicians from the medieval and Renaissance periods through the twentieth century, including the professional papers of many renowned Harvard faculty members as well as physicians and scientists from New England and around the country.

The 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Research Fellow is Kate Grauvogel, due to conduct research at Countway in June 2017. Previous fellows include Louella McCarthy, Rebecca Kluchin, Ciara Breathnach, Carrie Adkins, and Hilary Aquino.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

2017-2018 Countway Fellowships in the History of Medicine: Application Period Open

By , October 4, 2016
Herbolarium de virtutibus herbarum (Vincenza: Leonardus Achates, de Basilea, and Guilelmus de Papia, 27 October 1491). Ballard 368. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

Herbolarium de virtutibus herbarum (Vincenza: Leonardus Achates, de Basilea, and Guilelmus de Papia, 27 October 1491). Ballard 368. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine is pleased to offer annual fellowships to support research in the history of medicine.  Established in 1960 as a result of an alliance between the Boston Medical Library and the Harvard Medical Library, the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine is the largest academic medical library in the United States.  The Countway Library maintains a collection of approximately 700,000 volumes.  Its Center for the History of Medicine holds 250,000 books and journals published before 1920, including 802 incunabula.  The department’s printed holdings include one of the most complete medical periodical collections, an extensive collection of European medical texts issued between the 15th and 20th centuries, and excellent holdings of pre-1800 English and pre-1900 American imprints.  The book collection is strong in virtually every medical discipline and is particularly rich in popular medicine, medical education, public health, Judaica, and travel accounts written by physicians.  The Countway’s collection of archives and manuscripts, approximately 20 million items, is the largest of its kind in the United States. The manuscript collection includes the personal and professional papers of many prominent American physicians, especially those who practiced and conducted research in the New England region, or who were associated with Harvard Medical School.  The Countway Library also serves as the institutional archives for the Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.  The printed, manuscript, and archives holdings are complemented by an extensive print and photograph collection and the collections of the Warren Anatomical Museum.  Established in 1847, the museum houses an exceptional collection of medical artifacts, pathological specimens, anatomical models, and instruments.

The Francis A. Countway Library Fellowships in the History of Medicine provide stipends of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018.  Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and may be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library.  The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic. Preference will be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway.  The application, outlining the proposed project (proposal should not exceed five pages), length of residence, materials to be consulted, and a budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses, should be submitted, along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation, by February 15, 2017.

Applications should be sent to:

Countway Fellowships
Center for the History of Medicine
Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
10 Shattuck Street
Boston, MA 02115

Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials may be sent to: chm@hms.harvard.edu.

Awards will be announced in April 2017.

The Boston Medical Library’s Abel Lawrence Peirson Fund provides support for the fellowship program. The Boston Medical Library is a physicians’ non-profit organization, incorporated in 1877.  Its mission is “to be a Library for the dissemination of medical knowledge, the promotion of medical education and scholarship, and the preservation and celebration of medical history, and thereby to advance the quality of health and healthcare of the people.”  Today there are over 300 fellows of the Boston Medical Library.   In 1960, the Boston Medical Library entered into an agreement with the Harvard Medical School Library to combine staff, services, and collections into one modern biomedical facility.  The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine opened in 1965 and ranks as one of the largest biomedical libraries in the world.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Announcing the 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow

By , June 2, 2016

The Archives for Women in Medicine and Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine are pleased to announce the 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow: Kate Grauvogel.

Kate Grauvogel, 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow

Kate Grauvogel, 2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow

Kate Grauvogel is an advanced doctoral student in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Department at Indiana University-Bloomington. Broadly, her research interests include the history of women’s health, especially pathology and psychiatry in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Her current research focuses on women and experimentation in medicine, particularly the history of blood clotting disorders in reproductive-age women, and how physicians perceived the whole constellation of gender, reproduction, secretions, clots, and associated diseases.

Grauvogel’s dissertation is entitled, “A gendered history of pathology: blood clots, women, and hormones in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.” It argues that the bodies of women—whether as obstetric patients, cadavers, or sufferers of side-effects from birth-control pills—shaped pathological theory as well as understandings of the role of secretions (later identifiable as estrogens) in health and disease. It also explores the medical and cultural functions of the Pill in the twentieth century and its impact on women and their lives. In it, she hopes to show how nineteenth-century pathologists and twentieth-century physicians observed pregnant women and women on the birth control pill and gleaned important information from them, such as the idea that fluctuations in estrogens could lead to the formation of dangerous blood clots.

The project as a whole uses primary sources from France, England, and Germany. At the Countway, Grauvogel will add an American perspective from the Boston Hospital for Women Records, 1926–1983, The Free Hospital for Women Records, 1875–1975, the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, The Leona Baumgartner Papers, 1830-1979, the Janet Ward McArthur Papers, 1939-2005, and other collections. She will be looking for cases of lying-in illnesses, including blood clotting, which will shed light on how pathologists thought about dangerous blood clots in women as the result of either pregnancy or the Pill. She hopes to emerge with a better grasp of the ailments doctors observed in women, as well as and how they described and thought about such ailments.

We look forward to hosting Kate at the Center next summer.

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship is offered in partnership with the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine. Information regarding the Fellowship program is available at http://www.fhwim.org/fellowships/foundation-fellowships/ and https://www.countway.harvard.edu/chom/archives-women-medicine-fellowships.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship: Application Period Extended

By , March 16, 2016

Deadline Extended: March 31, 2016

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine will provide one $5000 grant to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible research period between July 1st 2016 – June 30th 2017. Foundation Fellowships are offered for research related to the history of women to be conducted at the Center for the History of Medicine at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. Preference will be given to projects that specifically address women physicians, scientists, or other health workers, but proposals on the history of women’s health issues may also be considered. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic.

Manuscript collections which may be of special interest include the recently-opened Marian C. Putnam Papers, Priscilla Schaffer Papers, Eva Neer Papers, or Miriam F. Menkin Papers. Preference will be given to those who are using collections from the Center’s Archives for Women in Medicine (see the full list of Archives for Women in Medicine collections here), but research on the topic of women in medicine using other material from the Countway Library will be considered (see our research guides list for online finding aids or Hollis for the most comprehensive information about all our holdings). Preference will also be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway library, but all are encouraged to apply, including graduate students.

Application requirements

Applicants should submit a proposal (no more than five pages) outlining the proposed project, its subject and objectives, length of residence, historical materials to be consulted, and a project budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses), along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation by March 31, 2016.

Beyond conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and will be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library.

Applications should be sent to: The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship, Archives for Women in Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials and any questions may be directed to chm@hms.harvard.edu. The fellowship appointment will be announced in May 2016.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine

By , December 14, 2015

On November 3, 2015, over 70 people gathered in the Waterhouse Room in Gordon Hall to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Archives for Women in Medicine and the 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship Lecture.

The event opened with remarks from Center for the History of Medicine Director Scott Podolsky and a brief history by Archives for Women in Medicine Project Archivist Joan Ilacqua.

The celebration continued with a talk by Amalie Kass and Eleanor Shore on the life of Anne Pappenheimer Forbes, a pioneer in endocrinology, a Harvard Medical School Professor at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and a mother of five. Kass and Shore’s recent Harvard Medicine article A Woman’s Work is available online. Several members of the Forbes family were also in attendance to expound on the many talents and achievements of “Nan.”

Eleanor Shore and Amalie Kass speaking at "Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine"

Eleanor Shore and Amalie Kass speaking at “Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine”

Anne "Nan" Pappenheimer Forbes (front row, third from left) in a 1954 photo of the Fuller Albright endocrine lab.

Anne “Nan” Pappenheimer Forbes (front row, third from left) in a 1954 photo of the Fuller Albright endocrine lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The celebration was also the occasion of the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine’s yearly fellowship lecture. 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine fellow Louella McCarthy’s talk Born International. Women, Medicine, and Modernity explored Australian women’s role in professional societies nationally and internationally. McCarthy was in residence at the Center researching the roles played by medical societies in women’s changing place in the medical profession, with a focus on the influence of American medical women on growing international networks of professional societies in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Louella McCarthy presenting “Born International. Women, Medicine, and Modernity”

The Center for the History of Medicine is so pleased to celebrate the many achievements of the past ten years of the Archives for Women in Medicine, a program created not only to address the gaps in documentary evidence of women leaders in medicine, but also to continue as an inspiration for future women in medicine.

A video of the 10th Anniversary Celebration is available here, and a portion of Ilacqua’s remarks are posted below.
Continue reading 'Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine'»

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Simmons Class Visits Center for the History of Medicine

By , December 2, 2015
A teaching model designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay and photographs of brains studied by Myrtelle Canavan.

A teaching model designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay and photographs of brains studied by Myrtelle Canavan.

On October 23rd, Simmons College’s freshman seminar, “What the Health is Going on in Boston?” led by Professor John Lowe, came to visit the Center for the History of Medicine. Focusing on Boston and Harvard Medical School, the class was treated to lectures on the history of women in medicine and a pop-up exhibit featuring materials from the Archives for Women in Medicine and Warren Anatomical Museum. The class read Eleanor Shore’s The Invisible Faculty and Jeffrey Flier’s Harvard Medical School Dean on the Gains—and Obstacles—to Women in Medicine to prepare for the trip.

Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine, highlighted Harvard Medical School’s long history regarding women students and faculty, as well as current efforts to close the wide gap between men and women full professors at Harvard Medical School. Ilacqua also explained the history of the Archives for Women in Medicine and the importance of documenting and celebrating the achievements of women in medicine.

This poster, an example of the criminal brain, is part of Myrtelle Canavan`s collection. Other examples of Canavan`s work are available via OnView.

This poster, an example of the criminal brain, is part of Myrtelle Canavan’s collection. Examples of Canavan’s work are available via OnView.

Louella McCarthy, 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine fellow, talked about her research on the history of Australian women in medicine and the international history of women in medical professional societies. McCarthy was in residence at the Center researching the roles played by medical societies in women’s changing place in the medical profession, with a focus on the influence of American medical women on growing international networks of professional societies.

Jessica Murphy, Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist, displayed a variety of Archives for Women in Medicine collections and Warren Anatomical Museum objects. Murphy’s pop-up exhibit included materials from the collections of Miriam F. Menkin, Elizabeth D. Hay, Myrtelle Canavan, and Kathryn Lyle Stephenson. Objects included images of Menkin’s first successful human in vitro fertilization, Hay’s teaching models, Canavan’s criminal brain photographs, and Stephenson’s facial reconstruction technique cards.

Teaching model of human embryo designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay.

Teaching model of human embryo designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay.

The students engaged the historian and archivists with questions about the history of women in medicine and how to succeed as a woman in medicine and science.

The Center for the History of Medicine is always pleased to host classes and other student groups. For more information, please email ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

2016-2017 Countway Fellowships: Application Period Open

By , October 5, 2015
Countway Library of Medicine

Countway Library of Medicine

The Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine will offer annual fellowships to support research in the history of medicine.  The mission of the Boston Medical Library (BML), incorporated in 1877, is “to be a Library for the dissemination of medical knowledge, the promotion of medical education and scholarship, and the preservation and celebration of medical history, and thereby to advance the quality of health and healthcare of the people.”  Support for the fellowship program is provided by the BML’s  Abel Lawrence Peirson Fund.

The Countway Library, created in 1960 by the partnership of the BML and the Harvard Medical Library, houses the combined collections of its two partners and is one of the largest medical libraries in the United States. It serves Harvard’s academic needs and the constituency of the BML which includes the other three medical schools in Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Medical Society, and practicing physicians.  Its Center for the History of Medicine holds 250,000 books and journals published before 1920, and is strong in virtually every medical discipline. The Countway’s archives and manuscripts include the personal and professional papers of prominent American physicians, such as Grete Bibring, Maxwell Finland, Henry Beecher, Walter Bradford Cannon, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Collins Warren, Stanley Cobb, and Benjamin Waterhouse, many of whom were associated with Harvard Medical School. The printed, manuscript, and archival holdings are complemented by paintings, prints, photographs, and the collections of the Warren Anatomical Museum.

The Francis A. Countway Library Fellowships in the History of Medicine provide stipends of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017.  Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and may be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic. Preference will be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway. The application, outlining the proposed project (proposal should not exceed five pages), length of residence, materials to be consulted, and a budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses, should be submitted, along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation, by February 20, 2016.

Applications should be sent to: Countway Fellowships, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials and any questions may be directed to chm@hms.harvard.edu.

The fellowship appointments will be announced by in April, 2016.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellow: Dr. Louella McCarthy

By , June 29, 2015

 

 

Louella McCarthy, 2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellow

Louella McCarthy,
2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellow

The Archives for Women in Medicine is pleased to announce our 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in
Medicine Fellow: Louella McCarthy, Ph.D.

Dr. McCarthy is Associate Professor and Academic Leader of Community Engagement in the Graduate School of Medicine at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. McCarthy’s primary research interests center on gender, medical education and medical practice. Her current research involves a comparative study of the history of women’s medical professionalism with a particular focus on the role of internationalism as a contested philosophy for medical women.

McCarthy’s doctorate was awarded by University of New South Wales in 2002.  Her thesis examined the role of gender in medicine through a close study of the rise of ‘the woman doctor’ in Australia and the consequent ‘gendering’ of medical practice. She has held a variety of academic positions in history but now focuses on medical education and particularly the potential role for the humanities and socio-cultural understanding in Australian medical education.

McCarthy is co-editor for the Palgrave Macmillan Gender & History series, an Editorial Board member and reviews editor for Metascience in the history and philosophy of medicine, and reviews editor for medical museums and exhibition reviews for Health & History. She is Past President and a National Councillor for the Australian & New Zealand Society of the History of Medicine.

In the course of her Women in Medicine Fellowship, McCarthy will research the roles played by medical societies in women’s changing place in the medical profession, focusing on the influence of American medical women on growing international networks of professional societies. During her time at the Countway Library, McCarthy will utilize several AWM collections, including the papers of Leona BaumgartnerGrete L. BibringEthel C. DunhamElizabeth D. HayJanet Ward McArthurLynne M. Reid, the Medical Women’s International Association publications and records, and US Medical Women’s Association materials, among other Center collections.

We look forward to hosting Dr. McCarthy at the Center this fall!

The Women in Medicine Fellowships are offered in partnership with the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

APPLICATION PERIOD EXTENDED: 2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellowship

Application period extended to March 31, 2015.

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine will provide one $5000 grant to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible research period between July 1st 2015 – June 30th 2016. Foundation Fellowships are offered for research related to the history of women to be conducted at the Center for the History of Medicine at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. Preference will be given to projects that deal specifically with women physicians or other health workers or medical scientists, but proposals dealing with the history of women’s health issues may also be considered. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic.

Manuscript collections which may be of special interest include the recently-opened Eva Neer Papers, Priscilla Schaffer Papers, or Marion Cabot Putnum Papers, or the collections of pioneers Mary Ellen Avery, Elizabeth Hay, or Grete Bibring. Preference will be given to those who are using collections from the Center’s Archives for Women in Medicine (see the full list of AWM collections here), but research on the topic of women in medicine using other material from the Countway Library will be considered (see our research guides list for online finding aids or Hollis for the most comprehensive information about all our holdings; note that the Hollis upgrade will be completed on December 22, 2014). Preference will also be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway, but all are encouraged to apply, including graduate students.

Application requirements

Applicants should submit a proposal (no more than five pages) outlining the proposed project, its subject and objectives, length of residence, historical materials to be consulted, and a project budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses), along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation by March 31th, 2015.

Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and will be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library.

Applications should be sent to: Women in Medicine Fellowships, Archives for Women in Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials and any questions may be directed to chm@hms.harvard.edu. The fellowship appointment will be announced in April 2015.

 

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Panorama Theme by Themocracy