Category: Center News

Apply now for a 2019-2020 New England Regional Fellowship!

By , December 7, 2018

The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC) is now accepting applications for 2019-2020 research grants.

NERFC is a collaboration of twenty-seven major cultural agencies that will offer at least twenty awards in 2019–2020. Each grant provides a stipend of $5,000 for a total of at least eight weeks of research at three or more participating institutions beginning June 1, 2019, and ending May 31, 2020. The Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine and its Center for the History of Medicine is a NERFC member.

NERFC will also make a special award in 2019–2020 on behalf of the The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, which will underwrite a project on the history of New England before the American Revolution.

All applications must be completed using our online form at www.nerfc.org/apply.

The deadline for applications is February 1, 2019.

Contact the Massachusetts Historical Society, by phone at 617-646-0577 or email fellowships@masshist.org, with questions. Download the poster or visit the NERFC website for a full list of participating member institutions.

 

Re-Centering the Narrative: A Brief History of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

By , December 4, 2018

 

On June 5, 1981, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia that afflicted “5 young men, all active homosexuals,” in Los Angeles.This report marked the beginning of public knowledge about the AIDS epidemic. What the report didn’t include was two other cases of the mysterious pneumonia – the first afflicting a gay African-American man, the other, a heterosexual Haitian man. This early omission of race was reflected throughout reporting during the HIV/AIDS crisis; historically the narrative focus has been on how the HIV/AIDS epidemic affected gay white men, while the experiences of American black and brown people with HIV/AIDS have been under documented, ignored, or written out of history.

In fact, the first case of HIV/AIDS discovered in the United States was Robert Rayford, a 16 year old black teenager from St. Louis, Missouri who died in 1969. The story of his sickness and  death, reported on in 1987, was eclipsed by the now disproven “Patient Zero” narrative that French-Canadian flight attendant, Gaëtan Dugas was the first person to bring HIV into the United States.

The time of mass HIV/AIDS deaths in the United States is largely behind us. A combination drug treatment, known as the AIDS cocktail, was discovered, leading to dramatic improvement in managing in HIV infection. After the introduction of the cocktail, the number of new AIDS-related deaths began to drop, starting in 1997. Today, HIV is a chronic condition for those with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Quinn, Robert John, “Robert John Quinn’s Memorial Books, Volume A,” Documented | Digital Collections of The History Project

Despite the discovery of the cocktail more than 20 years ago, HIV/AIDS continues to disproportionately affect African American and Latino men. According to the CDC, in 2016, African Americans accounted for 44% of HIV diagnoses, while Latinx people accounted for 26% of HIV diagnoses. Among Latino men, 85% of diagnosed HIV infections were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact, while more than half of African Americans (58%) who received an HIV diagnoses identified as gay or bisexual. The higher levels of HIV infection in black and brown communities of color is attributable to systemic bias, discrimination, structural racism, and lack of access to education and care. To face this ongoing crisis, we must acknowledge history and stories that have been hidden, and discuss how these histories can inform our current responses.

One of those stories is of Wilfred Colon Augusto, a Countway Library employee who died on September 17, 1991. Wilfred was a graduate of the State University of New York at Oswego, employed at Harvard Medical School, and by telephone company Nynex. He was active in the Latino Health Network. Wilfred’s obituary details:

Diagnosed with AIDS in 1985, Wilfred continued to live his life to its fullest. His great sense of humor and admiration for living allowed Wilfred to deal with the many challenges and the changing circumstances precipitated by AIDS. He enjoyed traveling, especially to his native Puerto Rico, and spending summers in Provincetown as well as dining out.

Today we remember Wilfred Colon Augusto, a member of the Harvard Medical School community, and a person whose story and experience should not be lost to history.


 

The Center for the History of Medicine in the Countway Library holds several collections related to the history of HIV/AIDS in Massachusetts and around the world, including the papers of:

  • Max Essex, Mary Woodard Lasker Professor of Health Sciences in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Steven L. Gortmaker, Professor of the Practice of Health Sociology in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Stephen Lagakos, Professor of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Richard G. Marlink, Bruce A. Beal, Robert L. Beal, and Alexander S. Beal Professor of the Practice of Public Health in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • 13 series of the Records of the Harvard AIDS Institute

The Center also holds oral history interviews and transcripts with hemophiliac men who were patients at the Boston Hemophilia Center, available on OnView.

Announcement: Archives for Diversity and Inclusion Program

By , November 6, 2018

Members of the Class of 1881 of the Harvard Dental School

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion. Building on the successes of the Archives for Women in Medicine program, the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion will expand in scope to include acquiring the research, teaching, and professional records of underrepresented faculty of Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and Harvard affiliated hospitals.

Joan Ilacqua is Archivist for Diversity and Inclusion at the Center for the History of Medicine. Ms. Ilacqua will partner with members of the HMS/HSDM community to diversify the historical record to include populations underrepresented in medicine (URM), including those who self identify as: Black or African-American; Hispanic or Latino; American Indian or Alaska Native; Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander; Asian; LGBTQ; or as a person with a disability. As a part of the revamped program, she will also continue to acquire the records of leading women in medicine. In the next year, she will implement a strategic acquisitions program by identifying records, archives, publications, and other materials created by groups underrepresented in medicine (URM) professionals affiliated with Harvard with long-term research and evidential value. She also plans robust outreach activities, including engaging an advisory committee and community partnerships, and capturing and sharing the experiences of URM faculty through exhibits, events, and oral histories. Ms. Ilacqua has already conducted oral history interviews with a number of faculty and alumni as part of the Equal Access Oral History Project

Formerly, Ms. Ilacqua was the Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine where she worked to ensure that the history of women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences were recognized in the Center for the History of Medicine’s collections. She serves on Harvard Medical School’s LGBT Advisory Committee, Equity and Social Justice Committee, and Joint Committee on the Status of Women. She won the 2018 Dean’s Community Service Award for her volunteer work with The History Project: Documenting LGBTQ Boston, a volunteer-driven community LGBTQ archives. A graduate of UMass Boston’s Public History master’s program, Ms. Ilacqua is currently enrolled in Harvard extension school’s Nonprofit Management certificate program.

The Center thanks the Office for Diversity Inclusion & Community Partnership, the Joint Committee on the Status of Women, the LGBT Advisory Committee, and the Office for Faculty Affairs for their support of the Archives for Women in Medicine program and the creation of the Archives for Diversity and Inclusion.

Speakers Announced for 2018 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

By , October 11, 2018

The Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and
the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
are pleased to present

The 2018 COLLOQUIUM ON THE HISTORY OF PSYCHIATRY AND MEDICINE
David G. Satin, M.D., DLFAPA Director

Open to students of history and those valuing a historical perspective on their professions.

All presentations are from
4:00 P.M.—5:30 P.M.
In the Lahey Room, fifth floor, Countway Library of Medicine

October 18
Emotionally Disturbed: The Care and Abandonment of America’s Troubled Children in the Twentieth Century, Deborah Doroshow, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Fellow in Medical Oncology and Academic Affiliate in the History of Medicine, Yale University

November 8
History of the Boston University School of Medicine: A Journey for Social Justice, Douglas H. Hughes, M.D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Ramsey Professor of Medicine and Professor of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine

December 20
Psychiatry in Revolution: Cuba 1959-1970, Jennifer Lambe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of History, Brown University

Registration is not required.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032
e-mail: david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

Register Now! Constructing Livable Lives: A Celebration of the Archiving of the Leston Havens Teaching Website

By , October 11, 2018

Join the Center for the History of Medicine in celebrating the archiving of “Constructing Livable Lives,” a free and active teaching website that brings together for the first time the teaching lectures, books, papers, videos, and audio recordings of American psychiatrist, psychotherapist, and prolific author Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011), Professor Emeritus, Harvard University. Speakers will address the impact of Dr. Havens’ work on medical education and psychiatry, as well as illustrate Dr. Havens’ commitment to using the history of psychiatry to inform contemporary practice.

Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011)

Leston Laycock Havens, MD (1924-2011)

Program

4:00-4:30
Refreshments and light fare

4:30-4:40
Opening remarks, Dr. Scott H. Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

4:40-5:00
“What Leston Havens Taught Me About the History of Psychiatry,” Dr. Edward Hundert, Dean for Medical Education and the Daniel D. Federman, M.D. Professor in Residence of Global Health and Social Medicine and Medical Education at Harvard Medical School

5:00-5:20
“Havens’ Gifts to Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,” Dr. Alex Sabo, Psychiatrist, Berkshire Medical Center; co-author, The Real World Guide to Psychotherapy Practice

5:20-5:35
“Building the Leston Havens M.D. Teaching Site,” Dr. Susan Miller-Havens

5:35-5:45
“Exploring the Archived Website: Where to Go and What You’ll Find,” Emily R. Novak Gustainis, MLS, Deputy Director, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

5:45-6:00
Q&A with Dr. Hundert and Dr. Sabo

 

Registration is required. Visit https://libcal.library.harvard.edu/event/4705514 to register.

 

Center Acquires Records on the History of Computing at Harvard Chan

By , September 13, 2018

Pictured in Cambridge in 2004: Taso Markatos, then the Assistant Dean for Information Technology at Harvard School of Public Health. Staff Photo Justin Ide/Harvard University News Office

The Center for the History of Medicine recently acquired an archival collection from the Department of Information Technology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Specifically, the collection is comprised of executive administrative records from the office of Taso Markatos, former Chief for Information Technology at Harvard Chan, who retired in June 2018. Markatos led the department for 27 years, giving him the distinction of being the longest-running head of any school’s IT department at the University.

The executive administrative files of the Harvard Chan IT department reflect the span of Markatos’ tenure at the school, and date back to the earliest days of computing on the Longwood campus. They provide a unique history of computing and technology trends, service consolidation, system replacements, and rational. This collection also details Markatos’ involvement with various university-level committees, including the CIO Council, the Longwood Medical Area network executive committee, Harvard Green IT working group, Harvard Administrative Innovation Group, & etc.

Although currently closed to research, once opened these records will allow for an excellent case study on the evolution of information technology and management at Harvard. For more information about the collection, contact Public Services at chm@hms.harvard.edu.

Register Now! Emerging Infections Then & Now

By , September 8, 2018

In partnership with the Harvard Global Health Initiative and Harvard Medical School’s Department of Global Health and Social Medicine the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, is pleased to announce the upcoming event

Emerging Infections Then & Now:
From the Influenza Pandemic to the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018 | 6:30pm – 9:00pm
Lahey Room, Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115

Registration is required.
Visit https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6KXIVkKTGWlsLZ3 to register.

PROGRAM

6:30pm – 6:45pm – Welcoming Remarks
Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine

Daniel LuceySenior Scholar, O’Neill Institute; Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Law, Georgetown University; Anthropology Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History


6:45pm – 8:15pm – Public Discussion – Emerging Infections Then & Now
Michele Barry, Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean of Global Health; Director, Center for Innovation in Global Health, Stanford University

Ramanan Laxminarayan, Founder & Director, Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP); Senior Research Scholar & Lecturer, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University; Affiliate Professor, University of Washington; Visiting Professor, University of Kwazulu Natal

Eugene RichardsonAssistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Associate Physician, Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Moderator: Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine


8:15pm – 8:20pm – Closing Remarks
Scott Podolsky, Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine; Director, Center for the History of Medicine at Countway Library of Medicine


8:20pm – 9:00pm – Exhibition Viewing

Selected items from Center for the History of Medicine historical collections related to the 1918 Influenza Pandemic will be on display

 

 

Announcing the 2018-2019 Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation Fellow

By , September 8, 2018

The Archives for Women in Medicine and Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation are pleased to announce the 2018-2019 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow: Carla Bittel, Ph.D.

Carla Bittel, Ph.D. 2018-2019 Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation Fellow

Carla Bittel is Associate Professor of History at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She is a historian of nineteenth-century America, specializing in the history of medicine, science, and technology. Her research focuses on gender issues and she has written on the history of women’s health, women physicians, and the role of science in medicine. Bittel is the author of Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America, published with the University of North Carolina Press in 2009. She has published in the journals Centaurus and Bulletin of the History of Medicine, and contributed to the edited volume, Women Physicians and the Cultures of Medicine. Her research has been supported by several grants, including a Scholar’s Award from the National Science Foundation. She is also a co-organizer of the Working Group, “Working with Paper: Gendered Practices in the History of Knowledge,” at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. Her current work examines the politics of gender and phrenology


The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation Fellowship is offered in partnership with the Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation (formerly the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine). Information regarding the Fellowship program is available at http://www.wimlf.org/fellowships and https://www.countway.harvard.edu/chom/archives-women-medicine-fellowships.

The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation was founded with the strong belief that understanding our history plays a powerful role in shaping our future. The resolute stand women took to establish their place in these fields propels our vision forward. We serve as stewards to the stories from the past, and take pride in sharing them with the women of today. Our mission is to preserve and promote the history of women in medicine and the medical sciences, and we look forward to connecting you to our collective legacy that will empower our future.

A program of the Center for the History of Medicine at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, the Archives for Women in Medicine actively acquires, preserves, promotes, and provides access to the professional and personal records of outstanding women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences.

Registration open for History, Uses, and Future of the Nobel Prize symposium

By , September 7, 2018

The Center for the History of Medicine is excited to announce the forthcoming symposium, The History, Uses, and Future of the Nobel Prize, to be held at Harvard Medical School (HMS) on October 4, 2018 in the Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall, Harvard Medical School.

Co-sponsored by the Consulate General of Sweden, Heinrich-Heine University, the HMS Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, the HMS Ackerman Program on Medicine & Culture, and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, the program will bring together historians and Nobel laureates to consider the history of the Nobel Prize and its enduring social, political, and scientific roles. The event will feature three panels: “Scientific Credit and the History of the Nobel Prize,” “The Nobel – and Ig Nobel – Prize in Practice, and The Uses and Future of the Nobel Prize.” A complete list of speakers is available on the symposium’s Countway’s events calendar page.

The symposium was organized by Nils Hansson (Heinrich Heine-University), David S. Jones (Harvard Medical School and Harvard University), and Scott H. Podolsky (Harvard Medical School and Director of the Center for the History of Medicine).

Registration is required. Please visit https://libcal.library.harvard.edu/event/4583053 to register.

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