Posts tagged: Boston Medical Library

Center for the History of Medicine collections in Autumn 2015 Harvard Medicine Magazine

By , December 7, 2015
Cast of John Thelwall, Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Cast of John Thelwall, Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Artifacts, artwork and ephemera from the Center for the History of Medicine’s Boston Medical Library and Warren Anatomical Museum collections highlight the “Backstory” section of the Autumn 2015 Harvard Medicine, entitled Voices. Complementing the magazine’s central theme, each historic piece focuses on aspects of human speech and the history of vocal health.

Ephraim Cutter Laryngoscope,  Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Ephraim Cutter Laryngoscope, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Featured from the Warren Anatomical Museum is a phrenological cast of the head of John Thelwall (1764-1834). Thelwall was an English professor of the science of elocution and a prominent member of the London Corresponding Society, which advocated for voting rights and government reform. In 1814, Thelwall published Results of experience in the treatment of cases of defective utterance, from deficiencies in the roof of the mouth, and other imperfections and mal-conformations of the organs of speech : with observations on cases of amentia, and tardy and imperfect developments of the faculties. The cast is part of the Warren Museum’s Boston Phrenological Society collection. In the Society’s  A Catalogue of Phrenological Specimens Belonging to the Boston Phrenological Society (1835), the Thelwall cast was categorized under the faculty of “Language.”

Johann Nepomuk Czermak Laryngoscope, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Johann Nepomuk Czermak Laryngoscope, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

The “Backstory” spotlights four historic items from the Boston Medical Library collection. Ephraim Cutter, Harvard Medical School Class of 1856, designed his own laryngoscope, based on the demonstrations of laryngoscopy pioneers Manuel Garcia and Johann Nepomuk Czermak. The device was manufactured by Cambridge, Massachusetts telescope lens maker Alvan Clark & Sons in 1859. The Library collection also includes a laryngoscope mirror designed by Czermak, who took the first endoscopic photograph. The article displays a drawing of the vocal tract by Medical School instructor in laryngology Franklin Henry Hooper, Class of 1877.

Franklin Henry Hooper vocal tract drawing, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Franklin Henry Hooper vocal tract drawing, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Also from the Boston Medical Library collection, the piece features the business card of Sarah Fuller, a noted 19th-century speech therapist. Fuller trained at the Clarke School for the Deaf in Northampton, Massachusetts and was the long-term principal of the Boston School of Deaf-Mutes. In 1890 Fuller gave Helen Keller her first speech lessons, using techniques she learned from Alexander Graham Bell. All four items were photographed for the Magazine, and the Hooper drawing is digitally displayed in the online version of the “Backstory.”

Artifact Photographs by John Soares.

Sarah Fuller business card, Harvard Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Sarah Fuller business card, Boston Medical Library, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

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2016-2017 Countway Fellowships: Application Period Open

By , October 5, 2015
Countway Library of Medicine

Countway Library of Medicine

The Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine will offer annual fellowships to support research in the history of medicine.  The mission of the Boston Medical Library (BML), incorporated in 1877, is “to be a Library for the dissemination of medical knowledge, the promotion of medical education and scholarship, and the preservation and celebration of medical history, and thereby to advance the quality of health and healthcare of the people.”  Support for the fellowship program is provided by the BML’s  Abel Lawrence Peirson Fund.

The Countway Library, created in 1960 by the partnership of the BML and the Harvard Medical Library, houses the combined collections of its two partners and is one of the largest medical libraries in the United States. It serves Harvard’s academic needs and the constituency of the BML which includes the other three medical schools in Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Medical Society, and practicing physicians.  Its Center for the History of Medicine holds 250,000 books and journals published before 1920, and is strong in virtually every medical discipline. The Countway’s archives and manuscripts include the personal and professional papers of prominent American physicians, such as Grete Bibring, Maxwell Finland, Henry Beecher, Walter Bradford Cannon, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Collins Warren, Stanley Cobb, and Benjamin Waterhouse, many of whom were associated with Harvard Medical School. The printed, manuscript, and archival holdings are complemented by paintings, prints, photographs, and the collections of the Warren Anatomical Museum.

The Francis A. Countway Library Fellowships in the History of Medicine provide stipends of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between July 1, 2016, and June 30, 2017.  Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency and may be asked to present a seminar or lecture at the Countway Library. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic. Preference will be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway. The application, outlining the proposed project (proposal should not exceed five pages), length of residence, materials to be consulted, and a budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses, should be submitted, along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation, by February 20, 2016.

Applications should be sent to: Countway Fellowships, Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115. Electronic submissions of applications and supporting materials and any questions may be directed to chm@hms.harvard.edu.

The fellowship appointments will be announced by in April, 2016.

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Oedipus and the Sphinx: a Gift for Isador H. Coriat

By , January 6, 2015
Bookplate of Isador H. Coriat, circa 1923. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

Bookplate of Isador H. Coriat, circa 1923. Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The acquisition and collection of books has long been a vocation and avocation for physicians, and one of the hallmarks of the true collector is the use of a distinctive bookplate to indicate ownership and provenance.  Medical libraries, in particular, have often collected bookplates of physicians, just as they have preserved and treasured their books, as the plates often display a high degree of craftsmanship and tend to incorporate elements of familiar medical iconography.

While some bookplates have only the simplest designs, with just a name or device of the owner, others are more artistic and evocative of the owner’s interests.  John Collins Warren’s bookplate showing the family’s armorial shield—the basis for the arms of the Harvard Medical School—is one such familiar item, as is the nautilus shell bookplate used by Oliver Wendell Holmes, commemorating his famous poem, “The Chambered Nautilus,” but there are many other examples in the rare book collection here at the Center for the History of Medicine.

The intention and planning behind a bookplate, though, is rarely recorded.  The recent acquisition of a sheaf of letters documents the design of a bookplate for pioneer psychoanalyst, Isador H. Coriat (1875-1943), one of the first followers of Freud in Boston.  The letters, mostly from Coriat’s wife, Etta Dann, are addressed to woodcut artist Julius J. Lankes (1884-1960), and concern the commission, design, and execution of a bookplate—a gift to Coriat from his wife.

Etta D. Coriat first wrote to Lankes late in 1922: “Having seen & admired your work in The Liberator & at Goodspeed’s [a Boston bookstore] for several years, I am most desirous of obtaining as a gift for my husband, one of your bookplates.  Can you submit a design characteristic of his work and also let me know about what it would cost?  You will find Dr. Coriat in Who’s Who in America—that, I think, will give you the scope of his work,” (December 11, 1922).

“After reading your letter, I decided that I had kept the secret long enough & so told Dr. all about it. He was delighted & when I asked him if he could suggest anything, he immediately said that Oedipus questioning the Sphinx was very appropriate & symbolic…. You see Dr. was one of the pioneers in this country in psychoanalysis, and his chief interest & work centers in that, it being the most scientific medium through which the neuroses & mental diseases can be interpreted & treated.  The application of psychoanalysis to cultural things as well has cleared the way for better work.  The plate will be used on all worthwhile books—cultural as well as medical,” (March, 1923).

Mrs. Coriat was deeply interested in the design and execution of the plate. “We were very much impressed with your conception of the subject…. The sketch marked A we liked best, just as your wife did, although I think the others could also be worked up with success.  As you say, the figure of the man in A could be less weak and the sword a little plainer, which I suppose would have been corrected anyway.  The name is spelled correctly on A, but insert the middle initial which is H. (Isador H. Coriat), no degree following and no prefix of Dr.—use just the name…. The more I look at them, the better I like them, and I am glad you found pleasure in working it all out.  I liked C too but the facial expression of A impressed me the most.  Dr. doesn’t like skulls—though I’d tell you,” (March 30, 1923).

“I am enclosing both proofs so that you will know what I mean when I ask you to try—if you can—to change the facial expression of the last proof so that it will look like the first one.  Is it some technical thing that changes the expression?  The second one looks a bit cruel and not as questioning as the other one,” (undated).

“We think the bookplate is going to prove a masterpiece and find it more fascinating every time we look at it.  I can easily see that the finished plate will be more beautiful in its lights & shades,” (April 24, 1923).

“Your charge for the bookplate is all out of proportion to its value as a work of art, and I can only hope to make up the difference in appreciation.  I have never given Dr. anything that he cares more about and certainly that I love so much,” (undated).

“I wish I could tell you how charmed we are with it [the bookplate].  It grows more impressive with age.  Isn’t that a sign of a good product?  Don’t forget to put your signature to the block,” (undated).

“And now let me tell you how much we like the bookplate and several of the medical men from different parts of the country to whom I have shown it were really quite charmed with it…. Doctor hasn’t decided just how many he will need, and I wish you could see how fine it looks in those large books.  Dr. has a very fine collection on symbolism—quite rare ones—which in time will probably go to the Boston Medical Library, as they haven’t any of them,” (June 12, 1923).

And what was Coriat’s opinion of the final result?  “I think it about time I expressed to you personally the satisfaction and pleasure which your book plate has given me.  The subject having so many variants, your particular conception of it was eminently gratifying.  It also pleased me to learn that you considered it one of your best plates and by all means use it in your forthcoming book…. Your work has had a special appeal to both Mrs. Coriat and myself for some time,” (November 14, 1923).

Many volumes from Isador H. Coriat’s book collection were bequeathed to the Boston Medical Library at his death, and examples of the bookplate with Oedipus and the Sphinx are easy to find.  The one depicted here is mounted in a 1591 Venetian edition of Albrecht Dürer’s Della simmetria dei corpi humani, libri quattro.

 

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October – December 2014 Event Calendar

By , September 30, 2014

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to invite you to this fall’s program of ten sponsored and co-sponsored lectures in the history of medicine and public health.

 

[DATE CORRECTION] October 14, 2014, 4:00 pm: “Jewish Medical Resistance in the Holocaust”
Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

Michael A. Grodin, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, and Professor of Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health

Minot Room, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 

(Free and open to the public. No registration required.)

 

October 15, 2014, 6:00 pm: “Anatomy and its Legacies: Artistic, Ethical, Scientific”

Naomi H. Slipp, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History of Art & Architecture, Boston University and 2014-15 Barra Foundation Predoctoral Fellow in American Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Christina J. Hodge, Academic Curator & Collections Manager, Stanford University Archaeology Collections, and Museum Associate, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

Sabine Hildebrandt, Instructor in Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Minot Room, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Registration required. To register, click here.
This event is free and open to the public.)

 

October 21, 2014, 5:00 pm: “The Birth of the Pill”

Jonathan Eig, writer and journalist

Ballard Auditorium, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Registration required. To register, click here.
This event is free and open to the public.)

 

October 30, 2014, 5:30 pm: “21st Century War: the Continuum of Pain and Other Sequelae”
39th Annual Joseph Garland Lecture

Chester ‘Trip’ Buckenmaier III, MD, Program Director, Defense and Veteran Center for Integrative Pain Management, US Army

Rollin M. Gallagher, MD, MPH, National Program Director, Pain Management Veterans Health Administration

Carl Walter Amphitheater
Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School 
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

(Registration recommended by October 10, 2014. This event is free and open to the public.
To register for the lecture only (free), email BostonMedLibr@gmail.com with your full name, email address, and phone number.
To register for dinner and the reception (pre-paid), please return this form and a check to the Boston Medical Library.)

 

November 18, 2014, 5:30 pm: “Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine”
Reception at 5:00pm

Margaret Humphreys, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine and History,Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities and History of Medicine, Duke University, and current President of the American Association for the History of Medicine

Lahey Room, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Registration required. To register, click here.
This event is free and open to the public.)

 

November 20, 2014, 4:00 pm: “Making the Suicidal Object: Sympathy and Surveillance in the American Asylum”
Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

Kathleen Brian, M.A., Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies, George Washington University

Ballard Auditorium, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Free and open to the public. No registration required.)

 

December 4, 2014, 5:00 pm: “The True Story of a Government-Ordered Book-Burning in America: Wilhelm Reich’s Books and Journals, and What Was in Them?”

James E. Strick, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Earth & Environment, and of Technology & Science, Franklin and Marshall College

Kevin Hinchey: Filmmaker, Associate Director of The Wilhelm Reich Museum, and Board Member of The Wilhelm Reich Infant Trust

Minot Room, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Registration required. To register, click here.
This event is free and open to the public.)

 

December 18, 2014, 4:00 pm: “Boundary Disputes Between British Psychiatry and Neurology”
Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

Stephen T. Casper, Ph.D., Associate Professor, History of Science, Humanities, and Social Sciences, Clarkson University

Ballard Auditorium, Fifth Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA

(Free and open to the public. No registration required.)

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Seeing Red, or Another Colorful Holmes Anecdote

By , September 17, 2014
[0003344, Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine]

Frontispiece of B. Joy Jeffries, Color-blindness: its dangers and its detection (Boston, 1883) [0003344]

Boston ophthalmologist, Benjamin Joy Jeffries (1833-1915) was one of the first American physicians to investigate the phenomenon of color blindness, and he began to speak and publish on the subject in the spring of 1877.  This was no academic question but a matter of public safety, following railroad and nautical disasters where green and red signal lights could not be distinguished by color-blind workers.  In 1916, just after Jeffries’ death, his daughter, Marion Jeffries Means, presented the Boston Medical Library with his substantial collection of research and letters from American and European colleagues, including Hugo Magnus (1842-1907) and Frithiof Holmgren (1831-1897)—all related to the subject of color blindness.  The Jeffries collection was recently rehoused and is now available at the Center for the History of Medicine.  A related recent discovery in the library’s artifact collection here is a mid-19th century red lens from a ship’s navigation light, donated by B. Joy Jeffries.  (Ships sailing at night traditionally show a red light on the port, or left-hand, side and a green on the starboard, or right, allowing sailors to determine direction and right-of-way.)

Though more closely related to art than science, one of the most intriguing of the letters in the Jeffries collection was written by Boston’s own Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894).

1878 June 11

Dear Dr. Jeffries:

I have neglected up to this time to thank you for your very interesting pamphlets on color-blindness.  I have double reason to thank you now, for I used a fact drawn from your essay in the following four lines in a poem delivered at Andover last Thursday:

Why should we look one common faith to find
When one in every score is color-blind?
If here on earth they know not red from green,
Will they see better into things unseen?

I suppose you hardly thought that your investigations would be used for so slight a purpose as a practical illustration, but I trust and do not doubt that they will serve a much more important end in keeping away from our railroad-switches those of whom it can be said truly “eyes have they, but they see not.”

Believe me, dear Dr. Jeffries,
Yours very truly,
O. W. Holmes

The poem Holmes mentions is “The School-Boy,” and it was first presented by him on the centennial of the founding of Phillips Academy at Andover, on June 6.  B. Joy Jeffries returned the compliment by using this stanza of Holmes’ poem as the epigraph for his monograph, Color-blindness: its dangers and its detection, which he first published in the following year.

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May 28th, 5:30 p.m., Broken Hearts: The Tangled History of Cardiac Care

The Boston Medical Library is pleased to present

THE 10th J. WORTH ESTES, MD HISTORY OF MEDICINE LECTURE

Broken Hearts: The Tangled History of Cardiac Care

Photo courtesy of David Jones.

Photo courtesy of David Jones.

David S. Jones, MD, PhD
A. Bernard Ackerman Professor of the Culture of Medicine
Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the Faculty of Medicine, Harvard University

Wednesday, May 28, 2014
5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Cannon Room/Building C
Harvard Medical School
240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA

Open to all. Registration is required.
Contact: Roz Vogel, Countway Administration
rvogel@hms.harvard.edu or 617-432-4807

Every day, all over America, people visit their doctors with chest pain and other symptoms of coronary artery disease. Each year over a million of them choose to undergo bypass surgery or angioplasty. Are these decisions good ones? Even though modern medicine has committed itself to an ideal of evidence-based medicine, with its clinical trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines, the answer is not always clear. By looking closely at the history of these procedures, it is possible to understand some of the reasons why this is the case. One problem is that clinical trial data has never monopolized medical decisions. Doctors and patients also pay attention to how treatments work, and if an intervention directly addresses the perceived cause of a disease — as often happens with surgery — then doctors assume that it will work. The challenge here is figuring out whether or not our understanding of the causes of disease is correct. The history of thinking about heart attacks shows how complicated this can be. Another problem is that clinical research generally often under-estimates the risk of medical interventions. It is easier to study the desired outcomes of an intervention than its expected or unexpected complications. As a result, doctors often end up with more thorough knowledge of a procedure’s efficacy than of its risks, an asymmetry that introduces a bias in favor of medical intervention.

Download the flier here: estes lecture 5 14

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Center objects featured in newly opened “Body of Knowledge” exhibit

By , March 11, 2014
Paolo Mascagni, Anatomia universa (1823-1832), Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Paolo Mascagni, Anatomia universa (1823-1832), Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

Forty-five artifacts, anatomical preparations, rare books, manuscripts, and art works from the Center of the History of Medicine’s Warren Anatomical Museum, Harvard Medical Library and Boston Medical Library collections are now on display in a new exhibit at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

The new exhibit, entitled Body of Knowledge: A History of Anatomy (in 3 parts), opened on March 6th and will run until December 5th. The exhibit’s narrative covers approximately 500 years of anatomical history and was the result of a special curatorial collaboration by the Center for the History of Medicine, Harvard University’s Department of the History of Science, the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical School’s Program in Medical Education, and Harvard Museums of Science and Culture. It was sponsored by the David P. Wheatland Charitable Trust, the Ackerman Program on Medicine & Culture, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Harvard Museums of Science and Culture.

The thirty objects from the Warren Anatomical Museum include wax injected teaching preparations by Oliver Wendell Holmes and Richard Hodges, osteological preparations made by Thomas Dwight, Jr., postmortem and dissection kits, and enlarged teaching models of the skull and foot by artist J. H. Emerton. The Center’s Harvard Medical Library and Boston Medical Library loaned a diverse wealth of rare anatomy books and manuscripts, ranging from Andreas Vesalius’s 1543 De humani corporis fabrica to Henry Gray’s 1858 eponymous Anatomy.

The exhibit was featured in a recent Wired.Com article and in the Harvard Crimson.

The Center for the History of Medicine will be launching a companion exhibit this spring at the Countway Library focused on the history of anatomical teaching at Harvard Medical School.

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The Sir William Osler Collection

By , November 6, 2013
Osler at work on The Principles and Practice of Medicine, 1891. Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. #0002497.

Osler at work on The Principles and Practice of Medicine, 1891. Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. #0002497.

Sir William Osler (1849-1919) remains one of the world’s most revered physicians, and his works are prized by medical libraries. His most famous and influential publication is the textbook of internal medicine, The Principles and Practice of Medicine, which first appeared in 1892. After Osler’s death, subsequent editions of this fundamental textbook were edited and revised by Thomas McCrae and then Henry A. Christian until 1947, with an estimated 500,000 copies printed.

In 1935, Dr. Henry Rouse Viets (1890-1969) presented the Boston Medical Library with a collection of 21 different issues and states of The Principles and Practice of Medicine, English-language editions as well as foreign translations, supplementing the library’s already considerable holdings of this work. The Osler Collection now contains a virtually complete set of copies and issues of all sixteen editions, along with copies of British editions, and French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and Chinese translations, and even the pirated fourth British edition of 1901. Additional Osleriana titles were acquired in 1955 by the gift of Dr. Joseph Hersey Pratt (1872-1956), who had studied with Osler at Johns Hopkins in the 1890s. The Pratt gift includes autographed copies of some of Osler’s other works, as well as a number of rare medical titles with presentation inscriptions to Pratt from Osler himself.

The photograph above shows Osler at work on The Principles and Practice of Medicine in the sitting room of Hunter Robb, the chief resident in gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital.  Osler appropriated Robb’s room for several months until completing his manuscript in October, 1891.  The photograph is from the collection of  Dr. William T. Councilman (1854-1933). who was assistant professor of pathology at Hopkins before assuming the Shattuck Professorship of Pathological Anatomy at Harvard in 1892.  The mat of the original print bears the inscription, “Dr. Osler writing a book.  Attention is called to the air of deep thought & preoccupation.  See also the number of ponderous tomes lying around.  He has diligently read all these.  Will the book be a good book?  Yes, it may be.”  The original photograph is part of collection of Councilman’s personal and professional papers which was donated to Harvard by Dr. William C. Wigglesworth, Councilman’s grandson, in 1978.

 

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38th Annual Joseph Garland Lecture, October 23, 2013: “Adventures at the Intersection of Medical Journalism & Public Health” with Lawrence K. Altman, M.D.

By , September 19, 2013

GARLANDLEC_Oct_2013

THE 38th ANNUAL JOSEPH GARLAND LECTURE:

“Adventures at the Intersection of Medical Journalism & Public Health”

 Lawrence K. Altman, M.D.
Medical Journalist/Columnist, The New York Times
Clinical Professor of Medicine, New York University

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Carl Walter Amphitheatre
Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA

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Sponsored by the Boston Medical Library in the Countway Library of Medicine

Attendance is free. Registration is required.
Contact Roz Vogel: rvogel@hms.harvard.edu or 617-432-4807

Dr. Altman has been a member of The New York Times science news staff since 1969. In addition to reporting, he writes “The Doctor’s World” column in Science Times. Dr. Altman currently is a senior fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard University, where he was the advertising manager and treasurer of The Lampoon magazine, and received his medical degree from Tufts University of School of Medicine.

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