Posts tagged: Deadly Medicine

Center’s Director interviewed on WBUR’s Radio Boston

By , April 27, 2011

Exhibit Highlights The Holocaust’s ‘Deadly Medicine’

By Meghna Chakrabarti
Apr 26, 2011, 3:51 PM  UPDATED 4:36 PM

From the article:

“Deadly Medicine,” the exhibit at the Holocaust Museum that features Hizme’s story, is an exploration of the lengths to which a group will go to pursue genetic purity. The museum was inspired to create the display not by history, but by the present pace of genomics research. Research that is sure to transform human health for the better, but not without rigorous ethical oversight.

Remembering what happens in the absence of such oversight is the reason why Scott Podolsky, director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the Countway Medical Library, wanted to bring the “Deadly Medicine” exhibit to Harvard Medical School.

“The technologies that we have and will have will outrace the implications of what we can do with those technologies and we have to be very critical,” Podolsky said.

For more information:

Listen to whole podcast

Watch video of Holocaust Survivor Irene Hizme who was featured in the exhibit.

About Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, a traveling exhibition from the The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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May 18: Deadly Medicine in the Nazi Era: What Turned Physician Healers into Killers?

The Boston Medical Library, in conjunction with the Deadly Medicine exhibition produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, presents:

Deadly Medicine in the Nazi Era: What Turned Physician Healers into Killers?

May 18, 2011, 7:00pm
    
Carl Walters Amphitheater,
260 Longwood Avenue,
Tosteson Medical Education Center,
Harvard Medical School 

Featured speakers:

Patricia Heberer, Ph.D., Historian, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Matthew Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Institute for Ethics, American Medical Association

Nazi Germany has been described as a “biocracy” whose medical profession justified the killing of millions of “undesirable” individuals through appeals to racist ideology and eugenics. Within this framework, healers and caretakers became killers, and medical research devolved into inhumane and unethical medical experimentation. An important impetus to develop codes of medical ethics in the 20th century was the international reaction to the profound involvement of the German medical community in the Holocaust and other crimes committed in the name of the Third Reich.

Please join us for an engaging discussion as we explore the historical context and legacy of Nazi medicine. The presentation explores the role of the German medical community as planners and implementers of eugenic policies, such as compulsory sterilization and “euthanasia”— the murder of institutionalized patients with disabilities during the Holocaust. The discussion considers the way many German physicians became involved in the criminal actions of the Nazi regime and how their involvement has profoundly affected medical ethics today.

This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Contact Roz Vogel at rvogel@hms.harvard.edu or call 617.432.4807.

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April 27: Genetic Determinism Then and Now: Confronting the Legacy of Eugenics

Dr. Eugen Fischer reading Heredity Journal. Dr. Eugen Fischer, director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Eugenics, and Human Heredity from 1927 to 1942, authored a 1913 study of the racially mixed children of Dutch men and Hottentot women in German southwest Africa. Fischer opposed “racial mixing,” arguing that “Negro blood” was of “lesser value” and that mixing it with “white blood” would bring about the demise of European culture. After 1933, Fischer adapted his institute’s activities to serve Nazi antisemitic policies. He taught courses for SS doctors, served as a judge on Berlin’s Hereditary Health Court, and provided hundreds of opinions on the paternity and “racial purity” of individuals, including the Mischlinge offspring of Jewish and non-Jewish German couples. Courtesy of Archiv zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem.

The  Harvard Medical School and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum present:

The Ackerman Symposium on Medicine and Culture,
Genetic Determinism Then and Now: Confronting the Legacy of Eugenics

April 27,
4 PM – 6:30 PM

Carl Walters Amphitheater,
260 Longwood Avenue,
Tosteson Medical Education Center,
Harvard Medical School

Featured speakers:

Daniel Kevles, Ph.D., Stanley Woodward Professor of History and Professor (Adjunct) of Law, Yale University

Paul Lombardo, Ph.D., J.D., Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law

Diane B. Paul, Ph.D., Professor Emerita, University of Massachusetts/Boston

Martin Pernick, Ph.D., Professor of History, University of Michigan

Daniel Wikler, Ph.D., Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health

Prior to the symposium, you are welcome to tour Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, a traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the Center for the History of Medicine’s companion exhibit, Galton’s Children: the Rise and Fall of the Eugenics Movement, both at the Countway Library on the Harvard Medical School campus.

Maps and directions are available here.

The Ackerman Program seeks to enhance research and teaching across a wide spectrum of fields devoted to the study of the culture of medicine. For more information about the Ackerman Program and the Symposium, contact:

Helena Martins
Harvard Medical School
641 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
P 617.432.3041
F 617.432.3721
ackerman@hms.harvard.edu
http://www.ackerman.harvard.edu

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April 14: Why Deadly Medicine Matters Today: Medical Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust

Nazi officials at the “The Miracle of Life” exhibition, German Hygiene Museum, Dresden, 1935. The new Nazi museum leadership asserted that societies resembled organisms that followed the lead of their brains. The most logical social structure was one that saw society as a collective unit, literally a body guided by a strong leader. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

This public program marks the opening of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race.

In the 1920s and early 1930s, Germany was a young democracy. In a relatively short time afterward, the Nazis assumed power, launched World War II, and carried out the watershed events now known as the Holocaust. Many German physicians and scientists, including world leaders in their fields, willingly lent support to the Nazi ideology and helped legitimize and implement the regime’s policies that culminated in the Holocaust. How was this possible in an educated and civilized society?

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has produced the special exhibition Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race to explore this question and its implications for our world today.

5:30 p.m. Exhibition Opening, Countway Library
10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115

7 p.m. Public Program, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, reception to follow
Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

Featured Speakers:
Michael Grodin, M.D., Professor, Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health
Irene Hizme, Holocaust survivor featured in the exhibition
Susan Bachrach, Exhibition Curator and Historian, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required.
Register online or contact the Museum’s New England Regional Office at 202.488.6585.

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May 12: When the State Makes Demands: Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

Dr. Enst Wentzler treats a child with rickets. Dr. Wentzler’s Berlin pediatric clinic served many wealthy families and high-ranking Nazi officials. Although Wentzler developed methods to treat premature infants or children with severe birth defects, he supported ending the lives of the “incurably ill” and served as a primary coordinator of the pediatric “euthanasia” program, evaluating patient forms and ordering the killing of several thousand children. Courtesy of the National Library of Medical Science, Bethesda, MD

The  Harvard Medical School and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum present:

When the State Makes Demands:
Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

May 12,
5:30 PM, Reception
7:00 PM, Program
Carl Walters Amphitheater,
260 Longwood Avenue,
Tosteson Medical Education Center,
Harvard Medical School

Featured Speakers:

Robert Jay Lifton, M.D.Lecturer in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Psychology, The City University of New York;

Jonathan H. Marks, B.C.L., Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities, and Law, and Affiliate Law Faculty, Pennsylvania State University Dickenson School of Law; and

Robert N. Proctor, Ph.D., Professor of History of Science, Stanford University.

Open to the public. For additional information, contact Francesca Holinko at ethics_health@harvard.edu or 617-432-3768.

Prior to the symposium, you are welcome to tour Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, a traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the Center for the History of Medicine’s companion exhibit, Galton’s Children: the Rise and Fall of the Eugenics Movement, both at the Countway Library on the Harvard Medical School campus.

Maps and directions are available here.

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February 9: Deadly medicine in the Nazi era: What turned physician healers into killers?

By , February 2, 2011

In Nazi Germany, the medical profession justified the killing of millions of “undesirable” individuals through appeals to racist ideology and eugenics. Healers and caretakers became killers, and medical research devolved into inhumane and unethical experimentation.

Please join us for an engaging discussion as we explore how German physicians became involved in the criminal actions of the Nazi regime and how international reaction to their involvement has profoundly affected medical ethics today.

Featured Speakers:

Patricia Heberer, Historian
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Matthew Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Institute for Ethics
American Medical Association

A cooperative effort between the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the American Medical Association, this program is free and open to the public, and you are encouraged to bring guests.

Reservations are requested; register online at www.ushmm.org/events/bostonfeb9.

Visit the travelling exhibit, “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race,” at the Countway Library, April 14 – July 17, 2011. A traveling exhibit of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, “Deadly Medicine” provokes reflection on the continuing attraction of biological utopias that promote the possibility of human perfection. From the early twentieth-century international eugenics movements to present-day dreams of eliminating inherited disabilities through genetic manipulation, the issues remain timely.To make reservations for group visits, contact Francesca_Holinko@hms.harvard.edu.

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“Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race” at the Countway, April 14 – July 17

By , January 2, 2011

Nazi officials at the “The Miracle of Life” exhibition, German Hygiene Museum, Dresden, 1935. The new Nazi museum leadership asserted that societies resembled organisms that followed the lead of their brains. The most logical social structure was one that saw society as a collective unit, literally a body guided by a strong leader. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race travelling exhibition will visit the Countway Library April 14 through July 17, 2011.

From 1933 to 1945, Nazi Germany carried out a campaign to “cleanse” German society of individuals viewed as biological threats to the nation’s “health.” Enlisting the help of physicians and medically trained geneticists, psychiatrists, and anthropologists, the Nazis developed racial health policies that began with the mass sterilization of “genetically diseased” persons and ended with the near annihilation of European Jewry.

Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race inspires reflection on the continuing attraction of biological utopias that promote the possibility of human perfection. From the early twentieth-century international eugenics movements to present-day dreams of eliminating inherited disabilities through genetic manipulation, the issues remain timely. (For more information about the exhibit, see the Museum’s website.) Deadly Medicine has been made possible by The Lerner Foundation and Eric F. and Lore Ross.

The Center for the History of Medicine’s companion exhibit, Galton’s Children: the Rise and Fall of the Eugenics Movement, examines the social phenomenon of eugenics from its origins and period of greatest influence in the early twentieth century, to discredit in the 1930s and its associations with the racial hygiene policies of Nazi Germany, and the persistence of eugenic ideas today.

Visitors are welcome to tour the exhibits Monday through Friday from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon to 5 P.M.

Groups larger than 12 people must make a reservation. Group visit information and and registration forms are available here: Planning_a_Visit and Group Visit Form. Questions about group visits can be directed to Francesca Holinko (Francesca_Holinko@hms.harvard.edu).

Public lectures relating to the exhibit will be held on on the Harvard Medical School campus:

Thursday, April 14, 7 pm: Why Deadly Medicine Matters Today: Medical Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust

Wednesday, April 27, 4 pm: Genetic Determinism Then and Now: Confronting the Legacy of Eugenics

Thursday, May 12, 7 pm: When the State Makes Demands: Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

Directions to the Countway Library and the Harvard Medical School campus can be found on the school website.

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