Posts tagged: Civil War medicine

November 19: Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospitals

By , September 28, 2015

The Center for the History of Medicine, together with the Harvard Medical School Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership, presents:

 

Studying Traumatic Wounds and Infectious Diseases in the Civil War Hospitals:

The Medical Photography of the American Civil War

 

Shauna Devine, PhD: Assistant Professor, Department of History, Western University, Canada

Dr. Shauna Devine is an historian of Civil War and American medicine. Devine has authored many articles on the Civil War medical history and won awards for her work including the H.N. Segall Award and the E.M. Wightman Award. Devine is also the author of “Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science” (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), which examines the development of scientific medicine during the American Civil War, and the impact of the War’s events on American medicine.

 

 

0001540_trimmed 0001542_trimmed_smallerThursday, November 19, 2015
5:30 PM

Reception begins at 5:00pm

 

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

 

 

 

This event is free and open to the public.
Registration is required.
To register, click here.

November 18: Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine

By , October 18, 2014

The Center for the History of Medicine and the Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership present:

Death and Diversity in Civil War Medicine

Margaret Humphreys, Ph.D.: Professor of Medicine and History, Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities and History of Medicine, Duke University, and current President of the American Association for the History of Medicine

This talk explores the reasons for the widely divergent death rates from disease among white Union troops, white Confederate troops, and black Union troops in the American Civil War.

November 18, 2014
5:30PM
Light refreshments at 5:00 PM

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Registration is required. To register, click here.
This event is free and open to the public.

April 10: Was the Civil War a Health Disaster?

The Center for the History of Medicine, Countway Library of Medicine, is pleased to co-sponsor with the Office for Diversity Inclusion & Community Partnership; Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity Inclusion; and Mongan Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Minority Health Policy, the Medicine and the Civil War Series:


Was the Civil War a Health Disaster?

featuring Andrew Delbanco, PhD
Mendelson Family Chair of American Studies and Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities, Columbia University, New York

Thursday, April 10, 2014
3:30 – 4:30 pm, reception to follow

Minot Room, Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA

Print and share the flier here: Andrew Delbanco_Lecture

ABOUT THIS LECTURE:  In this third lecture in the Medicine and the Civil War Series, Professor Delbanco will speak about the political and cultural situations leading up to the war between the states, and public health organizations that arose as a direct result of the need to care for the wounded and sick.

delbancoAndrew Delbanco, PhD is Mendelson Family Chair of American Studies and Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. He was awarded the 2011 National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama “for his writing that spans the literature of Melville and Emerson to contemporary issues in higher education.” In 2001, he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and named by Time Magazine as “America’s Best Social Critic.” In 2003, he was named New York State Scholar of the Year by the New York Council for the Humanities, in 2006, he received the “Great Teacher Award” from the Society of Columbia Graduates, and in 2013 he was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society.

Professor Delbanco is the author of many publications, including College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be (2012), which is required reading on many campuses, and Melville: His World and Work (2005), which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography, and appeared on “best books” lists in the Washington Post, Independent (London), and TLS, and was awarded the Lionel Trilling Award by Columbia University. He has edited Writing New England (2001), The Portable Abraham Lincoln (1992, 2009), volume two of The Sermons of Ralph Waldo Emerson (with Teresa Toulouse), and, with Alan Heimert, The Puritans in America (1985). His essays, ranging on topics from American literary and religious history to contemporary issues in higher education, regularly appear in journals such as The New York Review of Books and The New Republic.  His most recent book is The Abolitionist Imagination (2012).

Professor Delbanco has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and was a member of the inaugural class of fellows at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.  He is a trustee of the Library of America, and the Teagle Foundation, and trustee emeritus of the National Humanities Center. He has also served as Vice President of PEN American Center, and as a trustee of the Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Space is limited. RSVP online by Wednesday, April 2, 2014:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/627QY5J

Questions?  Contact: Terésa Carter via email (teresa_carter@hms.harvard.edu) or phone (617-432-4697).

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Now online: Video and Exhibit, “Battle-scarred: Death and Disability Since the Civil War”

By , January 22, 2013

"Group of officers who have undergone amputation for gunshot injuries," 1865. From vol. 3, image 1, Photographs of surgical cases and specimens, United States Surgeon-General's Office.

On December 13, 2012, the Center for the History of Medicine held a special program in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

Battle-scarred: Death and Disability Since the Civil War featured two eminent scholars:

Drew Gilpin Faust, Lincoln Professor of History and President, Harvard University, who presented “Civil War and the End of Life” and

Jeffrey Reznick, Chief, History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, who spoke on “Disability and the Cultural History of Modern War.” Attendees were welcomed by Scott H. Podolsky, Director, Center for the History of Medicine. Harvard Medical School Dean Jeffrey Flier introduced the speakers.

The video of the event can be viewed here.


Also online: the companion exhibit, Battle-scarred: Caring for the Sick and Wounded of the Civil War.

Like the Battle-scarred exhibit, which is on display in the Countway Library (floors 1, L2, and 5) through September 1, this shorter online version draws on the rich library and museum resources of the Countway’s Center for the History of Medicine to examine the experiences of the wounded and the ill and the men and women who cared for them on the battlefield, in hospitals and prison camps, and on the home front.

The online exhibit can be viewed here.

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This event was sponsored by the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine’s  McGovern Fund for the History of Medicine. Additional sponsors include the Center for the History of Medicine, Countway Library,  Ackerman Program on Medicine & Culture, and the HMS Office for Diversity and Community Affairs.

February 7: Mitchell L. Adams on “Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon and Soldier for the Union”

By , January 8, 2013

The wooden chess set pieces were carved by Zabdiel Boylston Adams and Fred Guyer during internment at Libby Prison in May 1864. Both were Captains in the Union army and injured and captured at the Battle of the Wilderness.

The Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership and the Center for the History of Medicine are pleased to present:“Dr. Zabdiel Boylston Adams: Surgeon and Soldier for the Union”

Mitchell L. Adams, MBA
Former Vice Chair of the Executive Committee, Harvard University Board of Overseers

Thursday, February 7, 2013
4:00 – 5:30 PM

Lecture and reception

Lahey Room, 5th Floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street
Boston, MA

Mr. Adams is the great grandson of Union Army soldier and surgeon Zabdiel Boylston Adams (MD 1853, Harvard University).

The Zabdiel Adams papers have been generously donated by the family to the Center for the History of Medicine and describe military camp life, battles, maneuvers, medical activities, and family matters between 1861 and 1865. The materials include his account of the Battle of the Wilderness fought on May 5–6, 1864 and the history of the 7th Massachusetts Regiment. Additional material consists of clippings and other printed materials. In his reminiscences of his military and professional activities written in 1884 and 1894, Adams writes of vaccination and public health, of witnessing post-mortems of cholera patients, and of the prevalence of fevers on ships carrying immigrants.

Mr. Adams will speak about his great grandfather, his legacy, and the generations of healers from which he is a descendant.

Space is limited. RSVP online by Thursday, January 31, 2013:
Questions? Contact: Teresa Carter via email (teresa_carter@hms.harvard.edu) or phone (617-432-4697).  Find the event flyer here: Mitch Adams_Lecture flyer_FINAL_1.3.13.

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