Posts tagged: Beth Israel Hospital

Norman Geschwind Papers Open to Research

By , October 20, 2014
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Norman Geschwind

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the Norman Geschwind papers, 1941-1984 (inclusive), 1968-1984 (bulk). The Geschwind papers include his professional correspondence, drafts of writings and related correspondence, research subject files, and event records from his involvement in professional and teaching activities. The Subject Files series contains Geschwind’s research files on Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s epilepsy, as well as aphasia, apraxia, and Gerstmann Syndrome.

Norman Geschwind (1926-1984) AB, 1947, Harvard College, MD, 1951, Harvard Medical School, was the James Jackson Putnam Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and the director of Neurology at Boston City Hospital (1969-1975) and Beth Israel Hospital (1975-1984). Geschwind’s research focused on the relationship between brain anatomy and behavior, including the areas of language and left-handedness, and the functional differences between brain hemispheres.

The finding aid for the Geschwind papers can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

Edward Lowenstein Papers Open to Research

Edward Lowenstein (from the archival records of Harvard Medical School’s Office of Public Affairs, Center for the History of Medicine)

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the Edward Lowenstein papers, 1967-2002 (inclusive). The papers are the product of Lowenstein’s activities as Chief of the Cardiac Anesthesia Group at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and as Anesthetist-in-Chief at Beth Israel Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). The papers include Lowenstein’s professional correspondence while working at MGH, his outgoing correspondence from Beth Israel Hospital and BIDMC, and records from his involvement in the merger of Beth Israel Hospital and New England Deaconess Hospital.

Edward Lowenstein (1934-), M.D., University of Michigan Medical School, is the founder of the Cardiac Anesthesia Group in the Department of Anesthesia at MGH. He served on the staff of the Department of Anesthesia from 1966 to 1989, while serving as Chief of the Cardiac Anesthesia Group from 1971 to 1983. Both the Group and its cardiac anesthesia fellowship program were the first of their kind.

Lowenstein is also the former Anesthetist-in-Chief at Beth Israel Hospital and BIDMC (1989-1997). After leaving BIDMC Lowenstein was a Senior Fellow in Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School (1997-1998), before returning to MGH in 1998 as Provost of the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care. In 1998 he was also named Henry Isaiah Dorr Professor of Research and Teaching in Anaesthetics and Anaesthesia and Professor of Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. Lowenstein is a faculty member of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The finding aid for the collection can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

James Harriman Jandl Papers Open to Research

By , July 10, 2012
"Red Cells Coated with Immunoglobin G: Binding and Sphering by Mononuclear Cells in Man", by James Harriman Jandl, 1967.

"Red Cells Coated with Immunoglobin G: Binding and Sphering by Mononuclear Cells in Man", by James Harriman Jandl, 1967, H MS c383. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the James Harriman Jandl papers, 1922-1993 (inclusive), 1940-1993 (bulk).  Jandl (1925-2006; B.S., 1945, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania; M.D., 1949, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts) was George Richards Minot Professor of Medicine Emeritus at Harvard Medical School, Senior Physician at Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and Senior Consultant in Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.  Jandl’s research focused on various aspects of hematology and hematologic disorders, including red blood cell abnormalities and development, hemolytic anemia, blood platelet transfusion, liver disease, and iron transfer between blood proteins and cells.  He is credited with discovering the mechanism by which reticuloendothelial cells destroy gamma globulin antibody-coated red blood cells.

Jandl’s papers are the product of his publishing, research, and professional activities, as conducted throughout his professional appointments at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory of the Boston City Hospital and Harvard Medical School.  The bulk of the papers consist of annotated manuscript drafts, galley proofs, and related publication correspondence for his contributions to various scientific publications related to hematology.  Writings concern multiple aspects of hematology and hematologic disorders, including acanthocytosis, hemolytic and megaloblastic anemias, hereditary elliptocytosis, hereditary spherocytosis, polycythemia, red blood cell destruction, and the reticuloendothelial system.  Papers also include patient records and charts, research notes and graphs, Harvard Medical School course curricula and teaching policies, collected reprints used for teaching purposes, audio recordings of scientific talks related to hematology, glass slides related to anemia,  and a scrapbook of newspaper clippings concerning the Boston City Hospital.

Processing of the collection was supported by the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Charles S. Minot Fund for Hematology.  The finding aid is available online.

Felix Fleischner Papers Open to Research

By , January 28, 2012

The Center is pleased to announce that the papers of Felix Fleischner, M.D. have been processed and are now open to researchers. Fleischner (M.D., 1919, University of Vienna) was Clinical Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and Radiologist-in-Chief, Emeritus, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston.

Fleischner’s papers are the product of his activities as a radiologist, educator, lecturer, and contributing member of national and international radiological societies. Fleischner’s research focused on pulmonary diseases, including atelectasis, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, emphysema, and tuberculosis, as well as diseases of the heart and colon. In addition to his clinical and administrative work, Fleischner authored numerous articles that appeared in The New England Journal of Medicine and Radiology, served as President of the New England Roentgen Ray Society, and was a member of the American Roentgen Ray Society and the Radiological Society of North America. In the late 1960s, Fleischner and a small group of radiologists began to organize a thoracic radiology society. When the society was formally created in December 1969, Fleischner’s colleagues named it the Fleischner Society, in memory of the radiologist.

To celebrate the opening of important Center collections in the history of radiology, including the papers of Felix Fleischner, the Center is hosting an event entitled “Beneath the Surface: The Development and Cultural Impact of Radiology” which will be held on Thursday, March 1, 2012. Additional information about the event can be found on the Center’s Exhibits and Events website and blog.

For more information about Felix Fleischner, the collection, and how to access the materials, please view the collection finding aid.

Processing of the Felix Fleischner papers was made possible by the Countway Library’s Lloyd E. Hawes Fund for Radiology.

Howard Hiatt Papers Opened to Research

Howard Hiatt, probably 1972, at the start of his tenure as Dean of Harvard School of Public Health. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Hiatt collection finding aid is now available here.

Howard H. Hiatt (1925-), M.D., 1948, Harvard Medical School, joined the Harvard Medical School faculty in 1955, was the first Herrman L. Blumgart Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Physician-in-Chief at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1963 to 1972, and Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health from 1972 to 1984. From 1988 to 1990, he was the Head of the Center for Policy and Education, Harvard AIDS Institute. Hiatt specialized in oncology and internal medicine, molecular biology, and biochemistry. He was also known for his public speeches and essays on the human consequences of nuclear war. During his tenure as Dean, the Harvard School of Public Health introduced teaching and research focused on molecular and cell biology, initiated programs in health policy and management, and biostatistics. Hiatt also integrated Harvard School of Public Health’s teaching and research programs with those in other Harvard University faculties, in an attempt to encourage cross-disciplinary research to bring together medicine and social science in the curriculum.

Records in the Howard H. Hiatt Papers were created by Hiatt during the course of his career as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Physician-in-Chief at Beth Israel Hospital from 1941 to 2001. Records in this collection consist of: personal and professional correspondence and subject files from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Beth Israel Hospital, and Harvard School of Public Health departments and offices, including the Office for Diversity, the Department of Health Policy and Management, the Harvard AIDS Institute, the Takemi Program for International Health, the Office of Program Planning, the Harvard School of Public Health Development Office, and the Center for the Analysis of Health Practices; ad-hoc and standing committee records such as the Advisory Committee on Planning, the Affirmative Action Committee, and the Chernin Committee on Outside Professional Activities; notes, book reviews, research files, and draft writings and publications on subjects such as nuclear disarmament, end of life care, and health resource allocation; executive administrative files including curriculum development records, meeting minutes, appointment books, grant proposals and reports; research data, lab notes, and reports from the Brigham and Women’s Medical Intensive Care Unit (Medical Intensive Care Unit) Study and the Harvard Medical Practice Study; speech and lecture files and notes; newspaper articles and magazine clippings; conference and professional organization materials; and a smaller number of photographs and memorabilia.

The preparation of this collection for research access was funded by the Council on Library and Information Resources.

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