Oct. 17, 2017: 42nd Annual Joseph Garland Lecture “Measuring Value in Healthcare”

By , August 25, 2017

The Boston Medical Library presents:

Measuring Value in Healthcare

42nd Annual Garland Lecture

Peter J. Neumann, Sc.D.: Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center & Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

 

Join us for Dr. Peter J. Neumann’s talk on the promises and pitfalls of using formal cost-effectiveness analysis to help the United States achieve better value for its health spending. Dr. Neumann, founder and director of the Cost-Effectiveness Registry, focuses his investigations on the use of comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness analysis in health care decision making.

 

shutterstock_129463487Tuesday, October 17, 2017

5:30 PM

Amphitheater, Armenise Building
Harvard Medical School
210 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115


To register, please contact the Boston Medical Library at BostonMedLibr@gmail.com or 617-432-5169.

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Oct. 19, 2017: Going Crazy at Work: The History of Carbon Disulfide

By , August 25, 2017

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Going Crazy at Work: The History of Carbon Disulfide”

Paul Blanc, M.D: Professor of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco

 

The second in a series of four lectures given as the 2017 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

carbon-disulfide-3d-balls

Thursday, October 19, 2017
4:00-5:30 PM

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

 

 

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Sept. 14, 2017: Freud, Reich, and Radical Politics, 1927-1933

By , August 16, 2017

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Freud, Reich, and Radical Politics: 1927-1933”

Philip W. Bennett, Ph.D.: Retired Professor, Fairfield University

 

The first in a series of four lectures given as the 2017 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

Thursday, September 14, 2017
4:00-5:30 PM

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

 

sigmund_freud_trimmed11418_120818458161_trimmed

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Sept. 20, 2017: From Riding Breeches to Harvard

By , August 2, 2017

The Center for the History of Medicine Presents:

From Riding Breeches to Harvard

Presentation in honor of Linda James Benitt given by Lady Long Rider, Bernice Ende, Great-Niece of Linda James.

 

lindajamesmontana_edited

Join us for an evening discussion on the life and career of Linda Francis James Benitt, the first female graduate of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The presentation will begin by briefly exploring the context of women at Harvard at the turn of century, as well as Linda James’ life in Boston as a young student. Next, Bernice Ende, Linda’s great-niece, will share her personal insights on Linda’s life, as well how she inspired her toward ultimately becoming a “lady long rider”.

Linda Frances James (pictured above in 1915) was the first woman to graduate from the Harvard-M.I.T. School for Health Officers (predecessor of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), receiving her C.P.H. in 1917. As a young public health professional in Boston, Linda worked as a Medical Social Worker at Massachusetts General Hospital, and as the Director of the After-Care Division at the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission. Her professional life shifted in 1922 when she married William A. Benitt, a young attorney from Goodhue, Minnesota. The couple decided to leave their careers and become farmers on Apple Acres—a 200-acre farm in South Washington County, Minnesota. In addition to life on the farm, James remained an active advocate for education, public health, and community. A two-part blog series on Linda is available here.

Bernice Ende was raised on a Minnesota dairy farm where riding was always an integral part of her life. After pursuing a career teaching classical ballet on the west coast, Ende moved to Trego, Montana, a remote part of North West Montana where she continued teaching ballet. Her retirement in 2003 brought not a lack of activity, but rather a change in focus. Drawn back to riding, Bernice felt the pull of the open road and adventure inherent in serious riding. Her first ride in 2005 has continued into the present. Now thirteen years later, having acquired nearly 30,000 equestrian miles, she inspires and encourages female leadership with her travels. For more information on Ende, visit her website: www.endeofthetrail.com

 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
3:30pm

Light refreshments will be served.

Minot Room, 5th Floor
Countway Library
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. Register online now through Eventbrite or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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June 15: Gender and Risk Perception in the Development of Oral Contraceptives, 1940-1968

By , May 12, 2017

The Archives for Women in Medicine and the The Women in Medicine Legacy Foundation present:

Gender and Risk Perception in the Development of Oral Contraceptives, 1940-1968

2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship Lecture

Kate Grauvogel:  2016-2017 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow, Doctoral student in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Department at Indiana University-Bloomington

Kate Grauvogel is an advanced doctoral student in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine Department at Indiana University-Bloomington. Broadly, her research interests include the history of women’s health, especially pathology and psychiatry in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her current research focuses on women and experimentation in medicine, particularly the history of blood clotting disorders in reproductive-age women, and how physicians perceived the whole constellation of gender, reproduction, secretions, clots, and associated diseases.

0002376_drefGrauvogel’s dissertation is entitled “A gendered history of pathology: blood clots, women, and hormones in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.” It argues that the bodies of women—whether as obstetric patients, cadavers, or sufferers of side-effects from birth-control pills—shaped pathological theory as well as understandings of the role of secretions (later identifiable as estrogens) in health and disease. It also explores the medical and cultural functions of the Pill in the twentieth century and its impact on women and their lives. In it, she hopes to show how nineteenth-century pathologists and twentieth-century physicians observed pregnant women and women on the birth control pill and gleaned important information from them, such as the idea that fluctuations in estrogens could lead to the formation of dangerous blood clots.

The project as a whole uses primary sources from France, England, and Germany. At the Countway, Grauvogel will add an American perspective from the Boston Hospital for Women Records, 1926–1983, The Free Hospital for Women Records, 1875–1975, the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, The Leona Baumgartner Papers, 1830-1979, the Janet Ward McArthur Papers, 1939-2005, and other collections. She will be looking for cases of lying-in illnesses, including blood clotting, which will shed light on how pathologists thought about dangerous blood clots in women as the result of either pregnancy or the Pill. She hopes to emerge with a better grasp of the ailments doctors observed in women, as well as and how they described and thought about such ailments.

 

Thursday, June 15, 2017
5:30pm
Reception at 5:00pm

Waterhouse Room
Gordon Hall
Harvard Medical School
25 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. Register online now through Eventbrite or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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May 23: 13th J. Worth Estes Lecture

By , March 28, 2017

The Boston Medical Library presents the 13th J. Worth Estes, M.D. History of Medicine Lecture:

Spare Parts
Hope, Drama and Dispute:

Heart Transplantation and Total Artificial Heart
Implant Cases in the 1960s

Shelley McKellar, PhD: Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

5:30pm

Cannon Room/Building C
Harvard Medical School
240 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

To RSVP, email BostonMedLibr@gmail.com or call Kerry O’Connor at 617-432-5169.

 

debakey-operating-1960s-nlm-profiles-in-science-collection

With the upcoming 50th anniversary of the first heart transplant operation, performed by South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard in December 1967, Prof. Shelley McKellar examines cardiac transplantation alongside the development of artificial hearts as replacement therapies for heart failure patients during the 1960s. Not long after Barnard, American surgeons Adrian Kantrowitz and Norman Shumway performed heart transplant operations in New York and California respectively. Within weeks, more cardiac surgeons jumped on the transplant ‘bandwagon.’

In 1968, more than 100 heart transplant operations were done worldwide, with Denton Cooley, Norman Shumway and Michael DeBakey performing the greatest number of cases. But patient mortality rates were appallingly high due to organ rejection and infection. Still, dying heart failure patients camped outside the offices of heart transplant surgeons, hoping for a life-saving procedure.

In 1969, Cooley implanted an artificial heart in a Houston man as a desperate measure to provide this. The device kept the patient alive for 64 hours until he received a donor heart, but this only sustained him for another 32 hours before he succumbed to pneumonia and kidney failure. The artificial heart implant case fueled the debate concerning the best cardiac replacement therapy—human or mechanical parts—to offer heart failure patients; neither produced satisfactory outcomes and many in the medical community questioned the continued pursuit of these treatments. (The 1969 implant case also severed the professional relationship of DeBakey and Cooley due to allegations of device theft and lack of authorization to perform the implant procedure.)

McKellar explores how the challenges and uncertainties experienced in heart transplant surgery augmented the standing and perceived value of artificial heart implantation as a complementary, not competing, cardiac replacement treatment in a period of ‘spare parts’ optimism in American medicine and society.

 


 

mckellar-headshot-low-resProf. McKellar completed a PhD in the History of Medicine at the University of Toronto, under the supervision of Prof. Michael Bliss. She then worked at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. on a documentary history project before taking a tenure-track position in the Department of History at Western University, London, Canada in 2003. In 2012, she became the Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University. In teaching medical students, she aims to foster an appreciation of the historical and cultural contingencies of medical practice; that is, to recognize that time and place matter regarding what we think we know and how we practice medicine.

Prof. McKellar’s research focuses on the history of surgery, predominantly cardiac surgery, medical technology, and the material culture of medicine. Her newest book, entitled Artificial Hearts: The Allure and Ambivalence of a Controversial Medical Technology is forthcoming – fall 2017 – with Johns Hopkins University Press. This book traces the history of an imperfect technology, situating the more-well-known events of the Michael DeBakey and Denton Cooley professional fall-out after the first artificial heart implant case in 1969 as well as the 1982-83 Jarvik-7 heart implant case of Barney Clark within a larger historical trajectory that also includes the development of atomic artificial hearts and ventricular assist devices (or ‘partial’ artificial hearts.) It can be seen as a case study that speaks to questions of ‘success,’ values, expectations, limitations, and uncertainty in a high-technology medical world that grapples with end-stage disease therapies.

McKellar has also written a biography of Toronto surgeon Gordon Murray, who operated on the heart in the era of closed-intracardiac operations (before open-heart surgery), built the first Canadian artificial kidney machine, and pursued research on a controversial cancer serum and a spinal cord surgical procedure to restore function in paraplegics. McKellar also co-authored a book, entitled Medicine and Technology in Canada, 1900-1950, which was commissioned by the Canada Science and Technology Museum to assist in their mandate to collect and research medical technology.

As much as possible, McKellar incorporates medical objects into her teaching and research. As curator of the Medical Artifact Collection at Western, she conducts object research, mounts displays, and runs ‘hands-on’ student workshops to spotlight the often ‘hidden’ history of medical instruments and devices.

 

 

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April 25: From Farmer’s Daughter to Physician

By , March 28, 2017

The Archives for Women in Medicine presents:

From Farmer’s Daughter to Physician:

The Advocacy, Activism, and Legacy of Dr. Mary Bennett Ritter and her Contemporaries

Dr. Gesa Kirsch: Professor of English at Bentley University

ritter_mb

Dr. Gesa Kirsch will discuss Dr. Mary Bennett Ritter, an early 20th-century woman physician, her cohort of Western women physicians, and the role of the Woman’s Medical Journal in creating and sustaining a large professional network of early women physicians. This lecture will speak directly to Dr. Ritter’s life and leadership and why this story is worthy of restoring to medical and women’s history.

Gesa E. Kirsch is Professor of English at Bentley University. Her work in women’s studies and rhetorical studies is extensive; she has authored and coauthored three books and edited five others. In March 2017, she published a new edition of More Than Gold in California, the memoir of Dr. Mary Bennett Ritter, an early California physician, civic leader, and women’s rights’ activist (Globe Pequot Press 2017). Her current research explores the rhetorical strategies, professional networks, and social activism of a group of late nineteenth-century women physicians.

 

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
5:30pm
Reception at 5:00pm

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. Register online now through Eventbrite or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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November 9: “Pyrrhic Progress – Antibiotics and Western Food Production (1949-2015)”

By , November 4, 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine presents:

Pyrrhic Progress – Antibiotics and Western Food Production (1949-2015)

Dr. Claas Kirchhelle: Research Associate, University of Oxford’s Martin School and the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine; Junior Research Fellow, Wolfson College

pig

This presentation will examine the history of antibiotic use in Western food production. It will ask why antibiotics were introduced to food production, track the development of agricultural antibiotic use on both sides of the Atlantic, and explore why regulations designed to curb bacterial resistance and antibiotic residues differ in the US and Europe.

Dr. Claas Kirchhelle’s work addresses the history of antibiotic use, resistance, and regulation on both sides of the Atlantic. In 2016, his dissertation Pyrrhic Progress was awarded the University of Oxford’s annual Dev Family Prize for the best thesis in the field of history of medicine.

 

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
1:00pm [NEW TIME]
Lunch served at 12:30pm

Lahey Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, use our online registration form or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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December 15: “From Attendants to Nurses: Philanthropy, Psychiatry and American Nursing 1940-1955”

By , October 12, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“From Attendants to Nurses: Philanthropy, Psychiatry and American Nursing 1940-1955”

6d822a15c164b94c14ec3be06c7001ceKylie M. Smith BA (Hons), PhD: Assistant Professor, Andrew W Mellon Faculty Fellow for Nursing and the Humanities, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

The third in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

Thursday, December 15, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

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