Posts tagged: M. Judah Folkman

M. Judah Folkman Papers Open to Research

By , August 7, 2014

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the M. Judah Folkman papers, 1907-2012 (inclusive), 1950-2006 (bulk). Folkman (1933-2008) was the Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery and Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, as well as Surgeon-in-Chief (1967-1981), Director of the Surgical Research Laboratory (1981-2003), and Director of the Vascular Biology Program (2003-2008) at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Folkman’s research focused on angiogenesis, angiogenesis inhibitors, and antiangiogenesis therapy for the treatment of cancer, a method by which certain factors can be used to shut down abnormal blood vessel growth. Folkman’s laboratory developed angiostatin and endostatin, two antiangiogenic factors that were used in cancer clinical trials.

The papers are the product of Folkman’s publishing, research, and professional activities throughout the course of his career. The Folkman papers include research records from his heart block, pacemaker, silicone rubber, and angiogenesis research, his professional writings, teaching records, administrative records, lectures, personal correspondence, appointment books, and photographs.

The finding aid for the Folkman papers can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

Processing of the M. Judah Folkman Papers was made possible through the generous financial support of Paula Folkman.

2014-2015 Women in Medicine Fellow: Dr. Rebecca Kluchin

By , July 7, 2014

The Archives for Women in Medicine is pleased to announce our 2014-2015 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow: Rebecca Kluchin, Ph.D.

Rebecca M. Kluchin, 2014-2015 Women in Medicine Fellow

Rebecca M. Kluchin, 2014-2015 Women in Medicine Fellow

Dr. Kluchin is an Associate Professor of History at California State University, Sacramento, and studies the history of women’s reproductive health in the United States.  Her first book, Fit to Be Tied: Sterilization and Reproductive Rights in America, 1950-1980 (Rutgers University Press, 2005), won the Francis Richardson Keller-Sierra Award for best monograph published in 2009 from the Western Association of Women’s Historians.  Her current project, Pregnancy and Personhood: The Maternal-Fetal Relationship in America, 1850 to the Present, examines the evolution of the public and private relationship between a woman and her pregnancy and explores the ways in which changing definitions of fetal rights, fetal personhood, maternal responsibility, and abortion have shaped the experiences and cultural understanding of pregnancy for millions of women across race and class.

Kluchin’s research shows that efforts to grant personhood rights to the “unborn” in the United States date back to the 1850s and have not always been embroiled in the politics of abortion. Pregnancy and Personhood considers the extent to which women’s experience with prenatal care, pregnancy, and motherhood has been influenced by maternal-fetal politics and studies how these politics have changed over time and why. During her time at the Countway, Kluchin will make use of numerous collections including the papers of Alan Guttmacher, Arthur T. Hertig, John Rock, Leona Baumgartner, Amalie Kass and Benjamin Osgood and as well as the records of the Boston Lying-In Hospital. Among other things, she will track the evolution of prenatal care and the language physicians used to describe the fetus and their pregnant patients’ relationship to it.  She will also consult the Countway’s collection of obstetrics guides from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as the papers of M. Judah Folkman as they relate to thalidomide.

The Women in Medicine Fellowships are offered in partnership with the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine.

Judah Folkman, Airplane, and the First Implantable Pacemaker

By , April 11, 2013

Judah Folkman with pacemaker research dog, circa 1957. H MS c365. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

While processing the papers of M. Judah Folkman, staff at the Center for the History of Medicine discovered a prototype of an early pacemaker developed by Folkman while a student at Harvard Medical School. Folkman worked in Robert Gross’s laboratory where he developed the first implantable pacemaker with Massachusetts Institute of Technology biophysicist, Fred Vanderschmidt. Accompanying the pacemaker were research records from the experiments conducted on dogs, as well as photographs of Folkman and cardiologist Paul Dudley White with Airplane, one of Folkman’s research dogs who was named Dog of the Year by the National Society for Medical Research.  Airplane’s award can also be found in the collection along with Folkman’s manuscript drafts about heart block and drafts of his Harvard Medical School thesis about a method he developed for correcting ventricular septal defects.

M. Judah Folkman was  the Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery and Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, as well as Surgeon-in-Chief and Director of the Vascular Biology Program, Children’s Hospital, Boston. In addition to the pacemaker, Folkman and David Long developed a method of using silicone rubber implantable polymers for the sustained-release of drugs while Folkman was serving as a Lieutenant in the United States Navy at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Folkman and Long’s patent for this device was eventually used to create Norplant, an implantable contraceptive.

Folkman’s pacemaker prototype was transferred to the Warren Anatomical Museum.

Processing of M. Judah Folkman Papers Has Begun

By , March 22, 2013

Letter to Folkman from Arthur T. Hertig explaining the history of the word angiogenesis, November 5, 1984. H MS c365. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that processing of the M. Judah Folkman Papers has commenced. Folkman (M.D., 1957, Harvard) was the Julia Dyckman Andrus Professor of Pediatric Surgery and Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, as well as Surgeon-in-Chief and Director of the Vascular Biology Program, Children’s Hospital, Boston. Folkman was known for his contributions to the field of angiogenesis research, the study of the process by which a tumor attracts blood vessels to sustain itself. Folkman was a pioneer in the research of antiangiogenesis therapy for the treatment of cancer. His papers reflect his work as a surgeon, research scientist, and educator.

The collection includes Folkman’s professional correspondence, research records, teaching records, journals, and manuscript drafts and publications. It also contains Folkman’s records from when he was a student at Ohio State University and Harvard Medical School, as well as research records he generated while serving in the United States Navy. The collection also contains a number of non-paper records, including films, negatives, X-rays, videocassettes, 35 millimeter slides, and lantern slides.

The collection is currently scheduled to open in 2013.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy