Posts tagged: Evgueni Chazov

Center Opens Collections Related to Physicians of Social Conscience

By , June 17, 2015
Jonathan Beckwith.

Jonathan Beckwith, undated. Harvard Medical School Office of Public Affairs, M-AD06. Publication Visual Resource Records, Series 00297. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that three collections related to physicians and social activism are now open to research, as part of the Center’s Access to Activism Project. These collections are the records of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (founded 1980), and the papers of Jonathan R. Beckwith (born 1935) and Sanford Gifford (1918-2013).

The International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War is an association of national medical organizations that seek to educate the international community of the dangers of nuclear war and weaponry.  Founded in 1980 by physicians from the United States (Herbert L. Abrams, Eric Chivian, Bernard Lown, and James E. Muller) and Soviet Union (Evgueni Chazov, Leonid A. Ilyin, and Mikhail Kuzin), the organization was awarded the 1984 UNESCO Peace Education Prize and the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize.  The records, 1957-1989 (inclusive), 1980-1987 (bulk), include administrative records, international congress records, petition campaign records, writings and publications, and audiovisual recordings of meetings and lectures, among other records.

Jonathan R. Beckwith is a microbiologist and geneticist at Harvard Medical School whose focus is on bacterial genetics; he is credited with isolating the first gene from a bacterial chromosome in 1969 with James Shapiro (born 1943) and Lawrence J. Eron (born 1944). He has advocated throughout his career for social responsibility in scientific and genetic research, and has also protested genetic, racial, and gender discrimination in science and society.  The papers, 1933-2011 (inclusive), 1965-2004 (bulk), include: Beckwith’s Harvard Medical School teaching and administrative records; research, lectures, and publications concerning the lac operon, disulfide bonds, membrane proteins, and other areas of bacterial genetics and microbiology; and administrative records of Science for the People and various other activist groups.

Finally, Sanford Gifford was a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, focusing on the psychiatry of twins, sleep deprivation, stress, psychophysiology, and the history of psychoanalysis, among other topics.  He was also a strong advocate against the Vietnam War, and was an early member of Physicians for Social Responsibility and Medical Aid for Indochina.  The papers, 1895-2013 (inclusive), 1950-2000 (bulk), include: Gifford’s psychiatric research records, lectures, and publications; oral histories and publications on the history of psychoanalysis; professional appointments records; and administrative and conference records for various professional and activist organizations.

The project, funded by a Hidden Collections grant by the Harvard University Libraries, sought to increase visibility and access to collections created by physicians of social conscience in order to reach a broad audience across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.  For more information on the project and these collections, please contact Emily R. Novak Gustainis, Head, Collections Services.

This post was updated to correct a previous statement regarding the founding and founders of the organization, 2018 April 03.

Staff Finds: IPPNW Collection of Audio and Audiovisual Recordings Related to Nuclear War and the Nuclear Arms Race

By , October 29, 2014
Audio and Audiovisual Recordings found in the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War records, H MS c432.

Audio and Audiovisual Recordings found in the IPPNW records, HMS c432. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

While working to open the records of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, processing staff at the Center for the History of Medicine discovered a sizable collection of audio and audiovisual recordings related to nuclear war and the anti-nuclear movement that were produced and collected by the organization.  Recordings date between 1980 and 1988, and include a variety of formats, including audiotape reels, audiocassettes, videotape reels, VHS, and various other videocassette formats.  Some highlights from the collection include:

  • Recorded meetings, sessions, and panel discussions of the first six IPPNW International Congresses.
  • Televised interviews of IPPNW members for various news programs, including interviews with several co-founders: Evgueni Chazov, Bernard Lown, and James Muller.
  • Films concerning children’s responses to the nuclear arms race, including: “There’s a Nuclear War Going On Inside Me” (1982), produced and directed by Eric Chivian (IPPNW co-founder), Roberta Snow, and Susan Wing, in collaboration with Educators for Social Responsibility; and “What Soviet Children are Saying about Nuclear Weapons” (1983), produced and directed by Eric Chivian, John E. Mack, and Jeremy P. Waletzky.
  • Broadcast recordings of the Moscow Telecast of the roundtable discussion between Soviet and American physicians on the medical effects of nuclear weaponry, originally broadcast in the Soviet Union in June 1982.
  • Recordings of the Beyond War Spacebridge teleconference link between the Soviet Union and the United States, held during the 1984 Beyond War Award Ceremony at which Bernard Lown and Evgueni Chazov simultaneously accepted the Beyond War Award on behalf of the IPPNW.
  • Various television programs’ episodes related to nuclear war and weaponry, including episodes of 60 Minutes, Cosmos, and Livewire.

Elizabeth Walters, Preservation Librarian for Audiovisual Materials at Harvard’s Weissman Preservation Center, has surveyed each recording for condition and format as part of the large-scale preservation survey of the Center’s audiovisual holdings, which commenced in 2011.  At the conclusion of the survey, the Center will have a complete picture of its current AV holdings, as well as a comprehensive understanding of the holdings’ preservation needs.

Processing of the IPPNW records is part of the Center’s Access to Activism project, made possible through a Hidden Collections grant from the Harvard University Library.  The records are expected to be opened to researchers in the fall of 2014.  For more information on the project, please contact Emily R. Novak Gustainis, Head, Collections Services.

This post was updated to correct a previous statement regarding the founding and founders of the organization, and to identify those responsible for producing and directing the two films related to children’s responses to the nuclear arms race, 2018 April 03.

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