Casper Morley Epsteen Papers Now Open

By , August 11, 2014

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that the Casper Morley Epsteen papers, 1928-1983 (inclusive), 1950-1979 (bulk) is now formally open for research.  An online guide to this collection is available here.

Teaching slide of Casper Morley Epsteen

Teaching slide of Casper Morley Epsteen

Casper Morley Epsteen (1902-1995), B.S., 1923, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago; M.D., 1925, University of Illinois College of Medicine; D.D.S., 1930, Loyola University Chicago College of Dentistry, was a senior attending surgeon at Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois, a Professor of Maxillofacial Surgery at Cook County Graduate School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, and a clinical professor of Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery at Chicago Medical School. As a maxillofacial surgeon, Epsteen helped found the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons in 1947, an organization he served throughout his life.

Epsteen’s papers consist of three cubic feet of records associated with his professional career as a maxillofacial surgeon, professor, and active member of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeons (founded 1947) and the American Board of Maxillofacial Surgery (founded 1946). They include: administrative records generated as a result of his service to the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgeon; personal correspondence; writings; assorted publications; and visual materials, which comprise the majority of the collection. The photographs, negatives, diagrams, x-rays, and teaching slides primarily depict maxillofacial fractures and different types of cysts, cancer, foreign bodies, and tumors.

The collection was processed by Gabrielle Barr, a University of Michigan student interning with the Center for the History of Medicine.

One Response to “Casper Morley Epsteen Papers Now Open”

  1. […] Casper Morley Epsteen papers, 1928-1983 (inclusive), 1950-1979 (bulk) […]

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