Category: AWM Exhibits and Events

HMS LXX: 70 Years of Women at Harvard Medical School

By , November 15, 2016

 

Excerpts from an oral history interview with Raquel E. Cohen, member of HMS’ first coeducational class compiled for HMS LXX

On October 21, 2016, Harvard Medical School celebrated over 70 years of women at Harvard Medical School. The event highlighted several milestones, including the 70th anniversary of Harvard Medical School’s first coeducational class, the appointment of the 250th woman as a full professor, the 20th anniversary of the Eleanor and Miles Shore 50th Anniversary Fellowship Program for Scholars in Medicine, which supports junior faculty, the funding of the Elizabeth D. Hay Professorship in Cell Biology, the 10th anniversary of the Archives for Women in Medicine, and over 40 years of the Joint Committee on the Status of Women.

The event featured a series of curated conversations with women in medicine, from medical students to international leaders in health, addressing issues of women’s leadership, challenges faced by women in medicine, and work done by women at the forefront of women’s health. The event was punctuated by a keynote conversation with Shirley Tilghman, President Emerita of Princeton University and member of The Harvard Corporation.

First class of women accepted to Harvard Medical School, 1945. (HMS, Classes and Reunions, 00100.057)

First class of women accepted to Harvard Medical School, 1945. (HMS, Classes and Reunions, 00100.057). Cohen is pictured in the top row, second to right.

The “Women’s View at HMS: Then and Now” panel featured a video excerpting highlights from Raquel Cohen’s 2006 oral history interview. Cohen, an internationally recognized expert in the field of intervention and assistance to survivors of disasters, earned her Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1942, and was a student in Harvard Medical School’s first coeducational class, graduating in 1949.

Although Dr. Cohen could not attend HMS LXX in person, highlights of her oral history, curated by Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine Joan Ilacqua, detail just a few moments of her fascinating life story. Dr. Cohen’s full oral history is available via Onview, and additional oral histories with women leaders in medicine and the medical sciences are available at: tiny.cc/womeninmedicine.

To learn more about the Archives for Women in Medicine, visit: countway.harvard.edu/awm.

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October 21: HMS LXX: 70 Years of Women at HMS

By , September 21, 2016

HMS LXX

70 Years of Women at HMS

Sponsored by The Archives for Women in Medicine, Harvard Medical Alumni Association, Joint Committee on the Status of Women, Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, The Center for the History of Medicine, Office for Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Partnership, and the Office of Faculty Affairs

 

HMSLXX_Banner

 

Join us for this celebration recognizing important milestones for women at HMS over the past 70 years, including the admittance of women students, creation of The Archives for Women in Medicine, appointment of the 250th woman as a full professor, and more.

 

October 21, 2016

Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

 

Seating is limited. Registration is first come, first served.
Tickets are $75 per person and include symposia, reception, and seated dinner.

For more information and for registration, visit the official event page.

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March 8, 2016 – Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England

By , March 7, 2016

The Archives for Women in Medicine, a program of the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine, presents:

Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England

IllComposedOlivia Weisser, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor of History, University of Massachusetts Boston

Olivia Weisser is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She earned a PhD in the History of Medicine from Johns Hopkins University and specializes in the history of the body, gender, and sexuality in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Her talk is based on her first book, Ill Composed (Yale Press, 2015), which explores health and healing in early modern England from the patient’s point of view.

 

Tuesday, March 8, 2016
6:00pm

Reception begins at 5:30pm.

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, use our online registration form or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine

By , December 14, 2015

On November 3, 2015, over 70 people gathered in the Waterhouse Room in Gordon Hall to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Archives for Women in Medicine and the 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellowship Lecture.

The event opened with remarks from Center for the History of Medicine Director Scott Podolsky and a brief history by Archives for Women in Medicine Project Archivist Joan Ilacqua.

The celebration continued with a talk by Amalie Kass and Eleanor Shore on the life of Anne Pappenheimer Forbes, a pioneer in endocrinology, a Harvard Medical School Professor at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and a mother of five. Kass and Shore’s recent Harvard Medicine article A Woman’s Work is available online. Several members of the Forbes family were also in attendance to expound on the many talents and achievements of “Nan.”

Eleanor Shore and Amalie Kass speaking at "Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine"

Eleanor Shore and Amalie Kass speaking at “Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine”

Anne "Nan" Pappenheimer Forbes (front row, third from left) in a 1954 photo of the Fuller Albright endocrine lab.

Anne “Nan” Pappenheimer Forbes (front row, third from left) in a 1954 photo of the Fuller Albright endocrine lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The celebration was also the occasion of the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine’s yearly fellowship lecture. 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine fellow Louella McCarthy’s talk Born International. Women, Medicine, and Modernity explored Australian women’s role in professional societies nationally and internationally. McCarthy was in residence at the Center researching the roles played by medical societies in women’s changing place in the medical profession, with a focus on the influence of American medical women on growing international networks of professional societies in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Louella McCarthy presenting “Born International. Women, Medicine, and Modernity”

The Center for the History of Medicine is so pleased to celebrate the many achievements of the past ten years of the Archives for Women in Medicine, a program created not only to address the gaps in documentary evidence of women leaders in medicine, but also to continue as an inspiration for future women in medicine.

A video of the 10th Anniversary Celebration is available here, and a portion of Ilacqua’s remarks are posted below.
Continue reading 'Celebrating 10 Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine'»

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Simmons Class Visits Center for the History of Medicine

By , December 2, 2015
A teaching model designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay and photographs of brains studied by Myrtelle Canavan.

A teaching model designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay and photographs of brains studied by Myrtelle Canavan.

On October 23rd, Simmons College’s freshman seminar, “What the Health is Going on in Boston?” led by Professor John Lowe, came to visit the Center for the History of Medicine. Focusing on Boston and Harvard Medical School, the class was treated to lectures on the history of women in medicine and a pop-up exhibit featuring materials from the Archives for Women in Medicine and Warren Anatomical Museum. The class read Eleanor Shore’s The Invisible Faculty and Jeffrey Flier’s Harvard Medical School Dean on the Gains—and Obstacles—to Women in Medicine to prepare for the trip.

Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine, highlighted Harvard Medical School’s long history regarding women students and faculty, as well as current efforts to close the wide gap between men and women full professors at Harvard Medical School. Ilacqua also explained the history of the Archives for Women in Medicine and the importance of documenting and celebrating the achievements of women in medicine.

This poster, an example of the criminal brain, is part of Myrtelle Canavan`s collection. Other examples of Canavan`s work are available via OnView.

This poster, an example of the criminal brain, is part of Myrtelle Canavan’s collection. Examples of Canavan’s work are available via OnView.

Louella McCarthy, 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine fellow, talked about her research on the history of Australian women in medicine and the international history of women in medical professional societies. McCarthy was in residence at the Center researching the roles played by medical societies in women’s changing place in the medical profession, with a focus on the influence of American medical women on growing international networks of professional societies.

Jessica Murphy, Center for the History of Medicine Reference Archivist, displayed a variety of Archives for Women in Medicine collections and Warren Anatomical Museum objects. Murphy’s pop-up exhibit included materials from the collections of Miriam F. Menkin, Elizabeth D. Hay, Myrtelle Canavan, and Kathryn Lyle Stephenson. Objects included images of Menkin’s first successful human in vitro fertilization, Hay’s teaching models, Canavan’s criminal brain photographs, and Stephenson’s facial reconstruction technique cards.

Teaching model of human embryo designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay.

Teaching model of human embryo designed and used by Elizabeth D. Hay.

The students engaged the historian and archivists with questions about the history of women in medicine and how to succeed as a woman in medicine and science.

The Center for the History of Medicine is always pleased to host classes and other student groups. For more information, please email ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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Archivist Attends September Women in Medicine Month Events

By , October 7, 2015

September is Women in Medicine month. The Archives for Women in Medicine celebrated by featuring women leaders in medicine on our Twitter account with the hashtag #WomeninMedicine. Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine, also attended Women in Medicine month events in the Longwood community and beyond.

Harvard Medical School’s Joint Committee on the Status of Women (JCSW) celebrated Women in Medicine month by holding a panel of women leaders in medicine on September 17, 2015. Panelists included Nancy Tarbell, Dean for Academic and Clinical Affairs and the C.C. Wang Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School (the finding aid for Dr. Tarbell’s papers is available here), Joan Brugge, Louise Foote Pfeiffer Professor of Cell Biology, Chair of the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Ludwig Center at Harvard, and Katrina A. Armstrong, Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chair of the Department of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief of Massachusetts General Hospital. Each shared the stories of their careers and the challenges of being a woman and a leader in medicine, as well as how they’ve tried to strike a balance between work and life. The JCSW facilitated a conversation between the panelists and audience that highlighted the importance of finding mentors and other supporters, and the ability to self-advocate to advance one’s career in academic medicine.

16th Annual Alma Dea Morani, M.D. Renaissance Woman Award Presented by the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine to Mary-Clare King, PhD

The Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine held its 16th Annual Alma Dea Morani, M.D. Renaissance Woman Award ceremony in New York City on September 24, 2015. The Foundation celebrated Mary-Claire King, PhD, American Cancer Research Professor of Genetics and Medicine (Medical Genetics) at the University of Washington. The Renaissance Woman award recognizes an outstanding woman physician or scientist who has demonstrated excellence and service in her field. Dr. King, who is still working, has had an incredible scientific career that includes discovering that humans and chimpanzees share 99% of the same genetics, discovering the breast cancer gene BRCA1, and creating genetic tests to identify kidnapped grandchildren of the Argentinian Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo. At the award ceremony, Dr. King spoke candidly about her scientific career and bias against women in the workplace. The ceremony was also an opportunity to speak with like-minded people about the importance of women in medicine and the history of women in medicine, including former Alma Dei Morani Award winners Carol C. Nadelson and Rita Charon.

The Archives for Women in Medicine and the Foundation have been partners for several years, and supporting the Foundation at its Awards ceremony was an honor. The Center for the History of Medicine is the repository for the Foundation’s oral history collection , and the Foundation sponsors a yearly fellowship at the Countway Library.

Brigham and Women's Hospital Women in Medicine and Science Symposium

Brigham and Women’s Hospital Women in Medicine and Science Symposium

The archivist also attended the 4th annual Brigham and Women’s Hospital Women in Medicine and Science Symposium on September 28, 2015. The symposium celebrated the achievements of Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s women faculty and trainees, and featured a keynote shared by two inspirational women leaders in medicine: Paula A. Johnson, Executive Director of the Connors Center for Women’s Health & Gender Biology, Chief of the Division of Women’s Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Ingrid T. Katz, Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, an associate physician in the Division of Women’s Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a research scientist at the Center for Global Health at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Faculty Chair of Harvard Medical School’s Joint Committee on the Status of Women. Four oral presentations, ranging in topics from research in endocrinology to pulmonology and pathology, were given, and a poster session featuring the research of six women was held. The full program and photographs of the symposium are available here.

September’s events highlight the importance and innovation of women leaders in medicine, celebrate the achievements of women in medicine and science, and inspire women to become leaders in medicine and science.  The Archives for Women in Medicine actively acquires, preserves, promotes, and provides access to the professional and personal records of outstanding women leaders, and celebrates women in medicine year round.

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November 3: Celebrating Ten Years of the Archives for Women in Medicine

By , September 22, 2015

Presented by the Archives for Women in Medicine, a program of the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine, in partnership with the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine:

 

Celebrating 10 Years of
the Archives for Women in Medicine

Since 2005, the Archives for Women in Medicine has documented and celebrated the professional records of women leaders in medicine.

To celebrate our anniversary, we’ll feature researchers who have used our collections to further the study and impact of women leaders in medicine and share our plans for the next phase of the Archives for Women in Medicine.

 

“Born International. Women, Medicine and Modernity”

Louella McCarthy: 2015-2016 Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine Fellow, Associate Professor and Academic Leader of Community Engagement in the Graduate School of Medicine at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Louella McCarthy, 2015-2016 Women in Medicine Fellow

Louella McCarthy

 

“Anne Pappenheimer Forbes, M.D., 1911-1992.
Harvard Medical School Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Endocrinologist, and Mother of Five”

Amalie Kass: Lecturer on the History of Medicine in the Harvard Medical School Department of Global Health and Social Medicine; historian and author of “Midwifery and Medicine in Boston: Walter Channing, M.D., 1786-1876”

Eleanor Shore: Senior Consultant to the Harvard Medical School Office for Academic and Clinical Programs; Harvard Medical School Dean for Faculty Affairs, Retired; Past Chair of the Archives for Women in Medicine

Anne Pappenheimer Forbes

Anne Pappenheimer Forbes

 

With remarks from Scott Podolsky, Director of the Center for the History of Medicine,
and Joan Ilacqua, Project Archivist for the Archives for Women in Medicine

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2015
6:30pm
Reception begins 6:00pm

Waterhouse Room
Gordon Hall
Harvard Medical School
25 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

 

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, click here.

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May 7, 2014: “Irish, pauper patients and the American maternity hospital, 1860-1913”

By , April 2, 2014

The Archives for Women in Medicine, Countway Library of Medicine is pleased to co-sponsor with the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine:

Dr. Ciara Breathnach, 2013-2014 Women in Medicine Fellow

Dr. Ciara Breathnach, 2013-2014 Women in Medicine Fellow

Irish, pauper patients and the American maternity hospital, 1860-1913

featuring Ciara Breathnach, Ph.D.
Lecturer in History, University of Limerick, Ireland
2013-2014 Women in Medicine Fellow

Wednesday, May 7, 2014
4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M., refreshments provided.

Lahey Room, Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA

All are welcome.
Please RSVP to ContactCHoM@hms.harvard.edu

ABOUT THIS LECTURE: Women in Medicine Fellow, Dr. Ciara Breathnach, will discuss her research using the archives of the New England Hospital for Women and Children (established 1862), held at the Countway Library’s Center for the History of Medicine.

Dr. Breathnach is a Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Limerick, Ireland, and has published on Irish socio-economic and health histories in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Breathnach’s research focuses on how the poor experienced, engaged with and negotiated medical services in Ireland and in North America from 1860-1912. It builds on her wider studies on the family unit and the social history of medicine in Ireland and will help to advance her hypothesis that the rural Irish female was slow to medicalize, not only for socio-economic reasons, but also for reasons of personal agency. Using evidence from archival records, her research aims to show that Irish women continued to present as a problematic group long after the ethnic associations with cholera and typhoid outbreaks of earlier decades had dissipated.

Download the flier: Breathnach_Irish_Maternity.pdf

Questions? Contact Carolyn Hayes or call 617-432-1324.

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New online exhibits from the Archives for Women in Medicine

By , December 23, 2013

Two legacy online exhibits, The Stethoscope Sorority and Grete L. Bibring: The Modern Woman, are now available through the Center’s new online collections site, OnView.

The Stethoscope Sorority

Over the years, women have faced, and continue to face, many struggles in the field of medicine. Despite this ongoing adversity, they have emerged as strong leaders and helped revolutionize the profession. The Archives for Women in Medicine (AWM) at the Countway Library was created in 2000 to capture and preserve the untold history of the many women who have helped change the face of medicine in the United States. This exhibition highlights materials from the AWM that illustrate women’s experiences as mentors, pioneering researchers, healers, and strong voices speaking out for their beliefs. Using their own words, the exhibition presents stories from some of the women of the AWM and the people who have helped contribute to their successes.

 

Grete L. Bibring: The Modern Woman

In the 1970’s, Dr. Grete L. Bibring created a seminar for Radcliffe College called ‘The Educated Woman’. A small group of students would gather to discuss the issues surrounding educated women and their lives. The concept of the ‘modern woman’ came to portray the dual roles of family and career that women had one point been forced to choose between. Dr. Bibring was a mentor for the emerging modern woman, understanding the demands and rewards of maintaining both a career and family.

Born in Vienna just before the 20th century, Grete L. Bibring would earn the honor of being the first female full clinical professor at Harvard Medical School in 1961. As a part of the “second generation” of Freudian scholars, her achievements include her appointment as Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Beth Israel Hospital in 1955, professional activities in numerous psychiatric organizations, such as the psychoanalytic societies of Vienna, London, and Boston and psychiatric consultant of the Children’s Bureau in Washington D.C. She was highly influential in integrating psychiatric principles into general patient care. Her passion permeated her other roles working with students, residents, physicians, social workers, and nurses across the globe. Dr. Bibring’s work continued well after retirement with a thought provoking seminar at Radcliffe, publication of multiple articles, and her dedication to patient care. This exhibit celebrates her life and her influence on the generations of medical, psychiatric, and social services professions.

Browse all of the Center’s online exhibits at Onview.

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