Category: Private Practices, Public Health (3PH)

Arnold Relman Papers Now Open to Research

By , June 19, 2014
Arnold Relman

Arnold Relman

The Arnold S. Relman papers, 1953-2011 (inclusive),  1974-2011 (bulk) are now open to research. The Relman papers contain records from his activities as Editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, author and researcher, and chair of the John Mack Inquiry Committee at Harvard Medical School, and include professional correspondence, research subject files on conflict of interest, for-profit hospitals, health care reform, the medical-industrial complex, and medical ethics, and records from his service on committees at Harvard Medical School and at the Massachusetts Medical Society. The papers also contain Relman’s writings, records from his attendance at professional meetings and conferences, and a small amount of personal records.

Arnold S. Relman (1923-2014; A.B., 1943, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; M.D., 1946, Cornell University) is a former Editor of the New England Journal of Medicine (1977-1991), nephrologist, professor, author, and researcher. After his residency at New Haven Hospital, Relman was on the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine from 1950 to 1967. In 1967, he became the Conrad Wesselhoeft Professor of Medicine at Boston University. From 1968 to 1977, Relman was the Frank Wister Tomas Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. In 1977, he was appointed Editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston, and Senior Physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston. In 2004, he won, with Marcia Angell, the George Polk Award in Journalism. Relman died on Tuesday, June 17, in his home in Lincoln, Massachusetts, of melanoma.

The finding aid for the Relman papers can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

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AAHM Workshop, Negotiating Access to Patient Related Materials: A Conversation between Archivists and Historians, Highlights Researcher Needs

By , June 3, 2014

On Saturday, May 10, 2014 members of the Private Practices, Public Health project team hosted a lunch session at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine in Chicago. The session, Negotiating Access to Patient Related Materials: A Conversation between Archivists and Historians, represents efforts by the Medical Heritage Library, Harvard Medical School, and Johns Hopkins University to develop best practices for archivists to speed access to patient-related and patient-generated records that are informed by the working realities of researchers and historians.  keys

Session panelists included Phoebe Evans Letocha, Collections Management Archivist, Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives at Johns Hopkins, who provided attendees with an overview of HIPAA and what has changed as a result of 2013 revisions to the Privacy Rule; historians Janet Golden, Rutgers University, and Cynthia Connolly, University of Pennsylvania, who shared with the audience their research experiences and difficulties using patient records to inform their research; and Emily R. Novak Gustainis, Head, Collections Services, Center for the History of Medicine, who presented on findings for the survey, Research Access to Protected Records Containing Health Information About Individuals, which sought to elicit information from researchers about what they want from descriptive guides to historical collections containing patient information. The session was moderated by Scott Podolsky, Director of the Center for the History of Medicine and newly elected AAHM Councilor.

Session participants generated a number of points for archivists to consider, including:

  • Opening up communications with institutional compliance officers to develop best practices for assessing the “real” risk using patient records for historical research presents to institutions
  • Developing better ways to communicate to institutional review boards (IRBs) that historians do not want to distribute research unethically
  • Forging a partnership between the American Association for the History of Medicine (AAHM), the Society of American Archivists (SAA), and a professional legal organization to help explain the different access laws to both archivists and researchers state by state and to help advocate for a more consistent researcher experience through more uniform laws
  •  Crowd-sourcing information on collections with restricted content through researcher participation to help future historians understand whether or not they should pursue an IRB

Feedback from the session will also be incorporated in to Gustainis and Letocha’s presentations at the August 2014 meeting of the Society for American Archivists as part of the session, Partners in Practice: Archivists and Researchers Collaboratively Improving Access to Health Collections.

 

 

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Lagakos Papers, Dept. of Biostatstics Records Open to Research

By , March 28, 2014
Stephen Lagakos

Stephen Lagakos

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce the opening of the Stephen W. Lagakos papers, 1971-2009 (inclusive), 1995-2009 (bulk) and the records of the Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, 1981-2009 (inclusive), 1999-2003 (bulk). The Lagakos papers include research records from Lagakos’s involvement in HIV/AIDS clinical trials, his professional writings, teaching records, records from his involvement with professional organizations, and personal correspondence, appointment books and photographs. The Department of Biostatistics records, most of which are from Lagakos’s tenure as chair of the department, contain administrative records, including those documenting faculty searches, appointments, and departmental meetings, as well as course schedules and evaluations.

Stephen W. Lagakos (1946-2009, B.S., 1968, Carnegie-Mellon University, M.Ph., Ph.D., 1972, George Washington University) was a biostatistician, AIDS researcher, and professor of biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health. Lagakos was a member of Department of Biostatistics from 1978 until his death in 2009, also serving as chair of the department (1999-2006). In the 1980s, Lagakos worked with Harvard School of Public Health colleagues on the Woburn Study, which linked higher incidences of leukemia and birth defects in Woburn, Massachusetts with polluted water supply wells. From 1989 to 1996, Lagakos served as director of the Statistical and Data Analysis Center, AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). In 1995, he became the founder and director of the Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research (CBAR). Lagakos died, along with his wife and mother, in an automobile accident in New Hampshire in 2009.

Processing of the collection was a part of the Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections project, funded by a Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through the Council on Library Resources (CLIR).  The project is a collaborative effort between the Center and the Chesney Medical Archives at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, on behalf of the Medical Heritage Library, to open public health collections previously closed to research, and to determine best practices for providing access to collections with protected health information and other types of restricted records.

The finding aid for the Lagakos papers can be found here.

For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

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Stephen Lagakos

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Center Staff Contributes to NEA Panel, “Perfecting the Process”

By , March 28, 2014
NEA Spring 2014

Amber LaFountain and Meghan Bannon at the NEA Spring 2014 Meeting in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

On Friday, March 21, at the New England Archivists’ Spring meeting in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Project Archivists Meghan Bannon and Amber LaFountain gave presentations on their experiences encountering and working through processing complexities that lead to policy review and revisions. The panel, entitled, “Perfecting the Process,” was moderated by Jennifer Betts, University Archivist for Brown University, and included presentations from Sara Beneman, Project Archivist for the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and Krista Ferrante, Archivist for The MITRE Corporation.

Meghan discussed the Center’s approach to handling electronic records as well as its adaptation of the tools used in digital forensics to process various types of electronic records using the Center’s FRED (Forensic Recovery of Evidence Device). Amber spoke about the factors influencing the determination of access and privacy protections for manuscript collections, and the access decision-making process. She also spoke about how the Center is working to make that process more transparent for researchers, as a part of the Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections project, funded by a Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through the Council on Library Resources (CLIR).

To view Meghan’s presentation on processing electronic records, please click here.

To view Amber’s presentation on access and privacy protections, please click here.

 

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Erich Lindemann Papers Open to Research

By , March 26, 2014
Erich Lindemann

Erich Lindemann, circa 1960-1969, Portrait Collection, From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that the Erich Lindemann papers are now open to research.  Lindemann (1900-1974) was Chief of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, Medical Director of the Wellesley Human Relations Service, Massachusetts, and Distinguished Visiting Professor in Clinical and Social Psychiatry at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.

Lindemann is known for his preventive intervention work with crisis patients and subjects of loss and bereavement.  His work with burn victims of the Cocoanut Grove fire of 1942 inspired his interest in the psychiatric and physiological effects of crisis, grief, and loss.  He later directed a study of the effects of loss and disruption on the displaced families of Boston’s West End redevelopment, the results of which later informed urban redevelopment projects across the country.  Lindemann is also recognized as a pioneer in the field of community mental health, advocating for collaboration between psychiatrists, psychologists, physicians, social workers, clergymen, teachers, and other community social service providers in the preventive therapy of crisis victims.  As a part of these efforts, he established a community mental health training program for social service providers at Massachusetts General Hospital, helped found the nation’s first community mental health agency in 1948 (the Wellesley Human Relations Service), and chaired multiple professional and national committees related to community mental health and preventive psychiatry.

The papers are the product of Lindemann’s professional, research, teaching, and publishing activities throughout the course of his career.  The bulk of the collection contains administrative, research, and teaching records generated during his tenure at Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, the Wellesley Human Relations Service,  and Massachusetts General Hospital.  The collection also contains: personal and professional correspondence; research data and administrative records of the West End Research Project; correspondence and records related to Lindemann’s service in professional organizations and committees; his writings and publications; and collected publications related to psychiatry and mental health.  Papers also include over 350 audio and audio-visual recordings of lectures by Lindemann and his colleagues, professional conferences, patient consultations, and meetings of the Wellesley Human Relations Service and of the West End Research project.

Processing of the collection was a part of the Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections project, funded by a Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through the Council on Library Resources (CLIR).  The project is a collaborative effort between the Center and the Chesney Medical Archives at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, on behalf of the Medical Heritage Library, to open public health collections previously closed to research, and to determine best practices for providing access to collections with protected health information and other types of restricted records.

For more information on Lindemann and his collection, please view the online finding aid.

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Would your research benefit from access to historical medical records?

By , January 17, 2014

As part of a joint effort to develop best practices for enabling access to special collections containing protected health information (PHI) and other types of access-protected (“restricted”) records, the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, and the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions are conducting a survey to determine what information researchers need in order to decide whether or not to pursue access to restricted health records, such as medical records, psychiatric/mental health records, and photographs taken as part of medical treatments.surveyclip

Whether you are new to research or an experienced historian, we’d like to know how you’ve located health related records relevant to your research, if you’ve been through the IRB (Internal Review Board) process, and, most importantly, what information you think should be included in library catalog records and manuscript and archival collection guides (“finding aids”). To participate, go to: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M25BFXF

The survey is being administered as part of grant work funded by a Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation through a program administered by the Council on Library Resources (CLIR) to increase access to critical resources currently unavailable to historical research. The grant, Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy-Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections, was proposed on behalf of the Medical Heritage Library (MHL), and will allow the Center and its partner, the Chesney Medical Archives, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, both MHL principal contributors, to open currently inaccessible public health collections to researchers while developing best practices for enabling access to special collections containing protected health information and other types of restricted records.

The findings of this survey will be reported at a 2014 American Association for the History of Medicine (AAHM) annual meeting lunch session and as part of a session at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society of American Archivists (SAA). By responding, you are helping libraries and archives improve how they describe records and make hidden collections available to researchers in more useful ways.

For more information about the survey, contact Emily R. Novak Gustainis.

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Processing of Arnold Relman Papers Has Begun

By , December 2, 2013
Arnold Relman

Arnold Relman

Center staff has recently started processing the Arnold S. Relman papers. Relman (A.B., 1943, Cornell University; M.D., 1946, Columbia University) began his career as a professor at Boston University School of Medicine and then became the editor of the New England Journal of Medicine (1977-1991) and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Nephrology was Relman’s initial research interest, but in later years he focused on medical ethics and health care reform, including the “medical-industrial complex”. The papers consist of Relman’s professional correspondence, writings, speeches and lectures, subject files and Harvard Medical School committee records.

This collection is being processed as part of a grant from the Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives program funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). The grant, Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy-Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections will allow the Center and its partner, the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, to open currently inaccessible public health collections to researchers while developing best practices for enabling access to special collections containing protected health information and other types of restricted records.

The collection is currently scheduled to be opened in early 2014. For information regarding access to this collection, please contact the Public Services staff.

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“Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy-Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections” Project Begins

Psychiatrists Erich Lindemann (center right) and Lydia M. Gibson Dawes (center left) at an unidentified social event. Lydia M. Gibson Dawes papers, 1926-1959 (B MS c96). From the Boston Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine, Countway Library, Harvard Medical School has received a $202,900 grant from the Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives program funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and administered by the Council on Library Resources (CLIR). The purpose of the program is to increase access to critical resources currently unavailable to historical research.

Private Practices, Public Health: Privacy-Aware Processing to Maximize Access to Health Collections, proposed on behalf of the Medical Heritage Library (MHL), will allow the Center and its partner, the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, both MHL principal contributors, to open currently inaccessible public health collections to researchers while developing best practices for enabling access to special collections containing protected health information and other types of restricted records.

The project will open the collections of seven leaders in the field of public health. Those being processed by the Center include the professional papers of Stephen Lagakos (known for his AIDS research and work linking poor water conditions to public health problems), Erich Lindemann (specialist in social and disaster psychiatry and community mental health), and Arnold Relman (a former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine who has written on the economic, ethical, legal, and social aspects of health care).

 

Contemporary debates in the field of public health, ranging from the possible role of universal health insurance to discourse around fundamental human rights and global health, are products of historical paths that must be contextualized. Through pooling collections and resources, the Center and Hopkins can reveal the national character of concerns ranging from AIDS to the equitable delivery of health services. Grant funding will also enable the Center and Hopkins to address the special collections community’s need for best practices to process and describe collections containing restricted records. Whether privacy is legally mandated (as with HIPAA and FERPA), imposed by parent organizations (as governed by an institutional records schedule), or applied per local practice, all repositories maintain records that pose significant challenges to access.

Project work commenced April 15, 2013 and will continue through April 2014.  Kathryn Hammond Baker, Deputy Director at the Countway’s Center for the History of Medicine, will serve as Principal Investigator for Countway, and Phoebe Evans Letocha, Collections Management Archivist at the Chesney Medical Archives, will serve as Principal Investigator for the Hopkins part of the collaborative project. Project Archivists are Amber M. LaFountain (Countway) and Linda Klouzal (Hopkins).

The Project has created a publicly-accessible wiki that may be of interest to archivists and researchers: https://wiki.med.harvard.edu/Countway/ArchivalCollaboratives/PrivatePractices. Look to the wiki for project documentation, bibliographies, calls for participants in project activities, and information about upcoming events.  For more information, please contact Kathryn Hammond Baker.

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