Category: Past Exhibits

Center Displays at the Labrary

By , November 30, 2012

Richard Pearson Strong (center) and colleagues on The Harvard African Expedition of 1934. From the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine.

The Center for the History of Medicine was invited to exhibit selections from its holdings at the Labrary, an innovation space at 92 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, hosted by the Library Test Kitchen, a Harvard Design School graduate course. The purpose of the Labrary display is to spark new thinking about the holdings and role of libraries.

The Center’s selections include a collection of 19th century calculi, early to mid-20th century games with medical themes, 19th century medical and dental instruments, and stereopticon cards from the Carnegie egg series to which HMS faculty members John Rock and Arthur Hertig contributed (ca. 1955). The Center also shared audio files from the Gamble-Cabot Cardiac Diagnoses Records (1916-1944), created to teach medical students how to interpret heart sounds, and three video files:

David Rutstein
lecturing on “Overweight” health issues on WGBH’s “The Facts of Medicine,” the nation’s first public health educational television show (1956);

Scans of the “Lowell hip,” the focus of a malpractice lawsuit in 1821 (2012); and

Tropical medicine pioneer Richard Pearson Strong traveling in Africa (1934).

Displays can be viewed from the street; the Labrary is also open 11-7 , Monday through Saturday. Center materials will be on view from December 1 – 20, 2012.

More information about this project will be added here as it becomes available.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Popular Bladder Calculus Featured In LiveScience.com article

By , September 7, 2011

Large Urinary Calculus, 04809, Warren Anatomical Museum, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine

A LiveScience.Com article and on-line exhibit, Gallery of Oddities: Interesting Things in Harvard’s Closets highlighted Warren Museum calculus 04809 and 12 other artifacts drawn from Harvard University’s innovative recent exhibition Tangible Things.

Tangible Things was curated by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, 300th Anniversary University Professor, Department of History and Ivan Gaskell, former Margaret S. Winthrop Curator and Senior Lecturer on History; with Sara Schechner, David P. Wheatland Curator of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments and Sarah Anne Carter, Lecturer on History and Literature. The exhibit drew from across the 50 repositories at Harvard University, united primarily in the gallery at Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments. For more on Tangible Things, see previous CHoM News entry “Center Artifacts On Display in Harvard University’s Tangible Things Exhibition.”

The bladder calculus was removed by Salem physician John Ball Brown in approximately 1809 and was donated to the Warren Anatomical Museum in 1877 by his son, Buckminster Brown. At the time when it was removed, it weighed 6.5 oz., was 8.25 inches at its greatest circumference, and was 3.125 inches long. The calculus was analyzed by Boston physician John Bacon and found to be mostly of uric acid, with a some urate of ammonia. It was not acquired from a soldier at Gettysburg as stated in the article.

The calculus was previously mentioned in a story on WBUR’s Radio Boston, highlighted in the CHoM News entry “Warren Museum bladder calculus featured on WBUR’s Radio Boston.”

The LiveScience.com article was associated with the MSNBC.com companion piece Century-old Tortilla Chip in Harvard Collection.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

May 18: Deadly Medicine in the Nazi Era: What Turned Physician Healers into Killers?

The Boston Medical Library, in conjunction with the Deadly Medicine exhibition produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, presents:

Deadly Medicine in the Nazi Era: What Turned Physician Healers into Killers?

May 18, 2011, 7:00pm
    
Carl Walters Amphitheater,
260 Longwood Avenue,
Tosteson Medical Education Center,
Harvard Medical School 

Featured speakers:

Patricia Heberer, Ph.D., Historian, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Matthew Wynia, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Institute for Ethics, American Medical Association

Nazi Germany has been described as a “biocracy” whose medical profession justified the killing of millions of “undesirable” individuals through appeals to racist ideology and eugenics. Within this framework, healers and caretakers became killers, and medical research devolved into inhumane and unethical medical experimentation. An important impetus to develop codes of medical ethics in the 20th century was the international reaction to the profound involvement of the German medical community in the Holocaust and other crimes committed in the name of the Third Reich.

Please join us for an engaging discussion as we explore the historical context and legacy of Nazi medicine. The presentation explores the role of the German medical community as planners and implementers of eugenic policies, such as compulsory sterilization and “euthanasia”— the murder of institutionalized patients with disabilities during the Holocaust. The discussion considers the way many German physicians became involved in the criminal actions of the Nazi regime and how their involvement has profoundly affected medical ethics today.

This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Contact Roz Vogel at rvogel@hms.harvard.edu or call 617.432.4807.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

April 14: Why Deadly Medicine Matters Today: Medical Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust

Nazi officials at the “The Miracle of Life” exhibition, German Hygiene Museum, Dresden, 1935. The new Nazi museum leadership asserted that societies resembled organisms that followed the lead of their brains. The most logical social structure was one that saw society as a collective unit, literally a body guided by a strong leader. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

This public program marks the opening of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race.

In the 1920s and early 1930s, Germany was a young democracy. In a relatively short time afterward, the Nazis assumed power, launched World War II, and carried out the watershed events now known as the Holocaust. Many German physicians and scientists, including world leaders in their fields, willingly lent support to the Nazi ideology and helped legitimize and implement the regime’s policies that culminated in the Holocaust. How was this possible in an educated and civilized society?

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has produced the special exhibition Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race to explore this question and its implications for our world today.

5:30 p.m. Exhibition Opening, Countway Library
10 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115

7 p.m. Public Program, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, reception to follow
Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

Featured Speakers:
Michael Grodin, M.D., Professor, Health Law, Bioethics, and Human Rights, Boston University School of Public Health
Irene Hizme, Holocaust survivor featured in the exhibition
Susan Bachrach, Exhibition Curator and Historian, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

This program is free and open to the public, but registration is required.
Register online or contact the Museum’s New England Regional Office at 202.488.6585.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

May 12: When the State Makes Demands: Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

Dr. Enst Wentzler treats a child with rickets. Dr. Wentzler’s Berlin pediatric clinic served many wealthy families and high-ranking Nazi officials. Although Wentzler developed methods to treat premature infants or children with severe birth defects, he supported ending the lives of the “incurably ill” and served as a primary coordinator of the pediatric “euthanasia” program, evaluating patient forms and ordering the killing of several thousand children. Courtesy of the National Library of Medical Science, Bethesda, MD

The  Harvard Medical School and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum present:

When the State Makes Demands:
Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

May 12,
5:30 PM, Reception
7:00 PM, Program
Carl Walters Amphitheater,
260 Longwood Avenue,
Tosteson Medical Education Center,
Harvard Medical School

Featured Speakers:

Robert Jay Lifton, M.D.Lecturer in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Psychology, The City University of New York;

Jonathan H. Marks, B.C.L., Associate Professor of Bioethics, Humanities, and Law, and Affiliate Law Faculty, Pennsylvania State University Dickenson School of Law; and

Robert N. Proctor, Ph.D., Professor of History of Science, Stanford University.

Open to the public. For additional information, contact Francesca Holinko at ethics_health@harvard.edu or 617-432-3768.

Prior to the symposium, you are welcome to tour Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, a traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the Center for the History of Medicine’s companion exhibit, Galton’s Children: the Rise and Fall of the Eugenics Movement, both at the Countway Library on the Harvard Medical School campus.

Maps and directions are available here.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

“Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race” at the Countway, April 14 – July 17

By , January 2, 2011

Nazi officials at the “The Miracle of Life” exhibition, German Hygiene Museum, Dresden, 1935. The new Nazi museum leadership asserted that societies resembled organisms that followed the lead of their brains. The most logical social structure was one that saw society as a collective unit, literally a body guided by a strong leader. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

The Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race travelling exhibition will visit the Countway Library April 14 through July 17, 2011.

From 1933 to 1945, Nazi Germany carried out a campaign to “cleanse” German society of individuals viewed as biological threats to the nation’s “health.” Enlisting the help of physicians and medically trained geneticists, psychiatrists, and anthropologists, the Nazis developed racial health policies that began with the mass sterilization of “genetically diseased” persons and ended with the near annihilation of European Jewry.

Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race inspires reflection on the continuing attraction of biological utopias that promote the possibility of human perfection. From the early twentieth-century international eugenics movements to present-day dreams of eliminating inherited disabilities through genetic manipulation, the issues remain timely. (For more information about the exhibit, see the Museum’s website.) Deadly Medicine has been made possible by The Lerner Foundation and Eric F. and Lore Ross.

The Center for the History of Medicine’s companion exhibit, Galton’s Children: the Rise and Fall of the Eugenics Movement, examines the social phenomenon of eugenics from its origins and period of greatest influence in the early twentieth century, to discredit in the 1930s and its associations with the racial hygiene policies of Nazi Germany, and the persistence of eugenic ideas today.

Visitors are welcome to tour the exhibits Monday through Friday from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturday and Sunday from 12 noon to 5 P.M.

Groups larger than 12 people must make a reservation. Group visit information and and registration forms are available here: Planning_a_Visit and Group Visit Form. Questions about group visits can be directed to Francesca Holinko (Francesca_Holinko@hms.harvard.edu).

Public lectures relating to the exhibit will be held on on the Harvard Medical School campus:

Thursday, April 14, 7 pm: Why Deadly Medicine Matters Today: Medical Ethics in the Shadow of the Holocaust

Wednesday, April 27, 4 pm: Genetic Determinism Then and Now: Confronting the Legacy of Eugenics

Thursday, May 12, 7 pm: When the State Makes Demands: Medical Professionalism, Dual Loyalty, and Human Rights

Directions to the Countway Library and the Harvard Medical School campus can be found on the school website.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

February 7: Public Health Exhibit and Event

By , November 29, 2010

 

(L to R) Drs. Quentin Gaiman, Donald Augustine, and Thomas Weller of the HSPH Department of Tropical Public Health.

Please join us on February 7, 2011 from 4:00-6:00 PM at the Countway Library for a panel discussion with three distinguished leaders in global health and medicine.

Dissolving Boundaries: Extending the Reach of Medicine and Public Health.

The fields of medicine and public health continue to change, confronting issues of ever-greater magnitude, and framed by debates concerning the boundary between organized medicine and public health, national versus global health concerns, and personal versus societal responsibility. Successful efforts to engage such issues are critically dependent upon a historical understanding of their evolution.The event will feature lecture and discussion from

  • Allan Brandt, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences; Professor of the History of Science; Amalie Moses Kass Professor of the History of Medicine.
  • Julio Frenk, M.D., Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, Harvard School of Public Health; T & G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health and International Development, Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Kennedy School
  • Jeffrey S. Flier, M.D., Dean of the Faculty, Harvard Medical School; Caroline Shields Walker Professor of Medicine

An accompanying exhibit, curated by Center staff, will draw from the archival collections of key leaders in American public health from the twentieth century, including Leona Baumgartner, Allan Macy Butler, Philip Drinker, Alice Hamilton, Howard Hiatt, Alexander Langmuir, David Rutstein, Richard Pearson Strong, and James Whittenberger.

RSVP to  contactchom@hms.harvard.edu.

.


Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Upcoming exhibits in December 2010: “Opening Doors” and “Bridging the Gap”

By , September 30, 2010

Upcoming exhibits in December 2010:

Opening Doors: Contemporary African American Surgeons

Bridging the Gap: Contributions of African American surgeons at Harvard

Dr. Louis T. Wright

The Center for the History of Medicine will present two exhibits in December 2010 through January 2011. The Center will host a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine entitled Opening Doors: Contemporary African American Surgeons. The exhibit shares the stories and highlights the achievements of past and present African American surgeons.

The Center will display its own holdings in Bridging the Gap: Contributions of African American surgeons at Harvard, including selections from the collections of Dr. Louis Tompkins Wright and Dr. Augustus A. White III.

Dr. Louis T. Wright graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1915. He spent the majority of his surgical career at Harlem Hospital in New York. Dr. Wright was the first African American to perform major surgery in New York and the first to be appointed to the positions of director of surgery and police surgeon. He was a dedicated civil rights activist and leader in the NAACP. Almost six decades later, Dr. Gus White arrived at Harvard Medical School after teaching for thirteen years at Yale University School of Medicine. He has served as Orthopaedic Surgeon-in-Chief of Beth Israel Hospital and Master of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Society at HMS and is currently Ellen and Melvin Gordon Distinguished Professor of Medical Education, Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. In March 2010, Dr. White was honored by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons with the fifth annual William W. Tipton Jr., MD, Leadership Award for his work as an educator, a mentor, and a champion of diversity initiatives.

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Mary Ellen Avery Exhibit at Children’s Hospital through November

By , September 29, 2010

Avery exhibit case at Children’s Hospital Boston

Two organizations are celebrating Mary Ellen Avery through a collaborative exhibit featuring items from the extensive archival collections generated from her pioneering career and contributions to pediatrics.  The Children’s Hospital Boston Archives and the Harvard Medical School’s Archives for Women in Medicine and Warren Anatomical Museum have placed on display original and reproduced items from Avery’s archives, including her childhood diary, vials of sheep lung surfactant, photographs, correspondence, and other documents.

The exhibit can be viewed in the main lobby of the Enders Building at 300 Longwood Avenue in Boston, Mass.  If you get a chance to stop by and see it, please comment and let us know what you think!

Related post: Mary Ellen Avery papers now open for research

More on Avery: Finding aid to the Mary Ellen Avery Papers, 1929-2002

Share on Facebook
[`twib` not found]
Pocket

Panorama Theme by Themocracy