November 17: “Madness, Politics, and Society: Toptasi Mental Asylum”

By , October 12, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Madness, Politics, and Society: Toptasi Mental Asylum”

insane-patients-in-the-toptascca7c4b1-mental-asylumFatih Artvinli, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor of the History of Medicine and Ethics, Acibadem University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey

The second in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

Thursday, November 17, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

October 18: “The Great Moment and the Advent of Anesthesia”

By , October 12, 2016

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine at the Countway Library present:

Movie Night: The Great Moment and the Advent of Anesthesia

On the heels of the 170th anniversary of the first successful public demonstration of anesthesia at MGH, join us for two cinematic interpretations of that fateful day. We will screen “The Great Moment,” a 1944 film directed by Preston Sturges, which focuses on dentist William T.G. Morton; and “The Advent of Anesthesia,” a short, silent 1936 film in which contemporary MGH staff reenacted the events of October 16, 1846. (Hint: One of these films is pretty true to history, and the other is … not.)

 

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Tuesday, October 18, 2016
6:00-8:00pm

Light refreshments will be served.

Paul S. Russell, MD Museum of Medical History and Innovation
Massachusetts General Hospital
2 North Grove Street, Boston MA 02114

To register, email mghhistory@partners.org or call 617.724.2755.

October 21: HMS LXX: 70 Years of Women at HMS

By , September 21, 2016

HMS LXX

70 Years of Women at HMS

Sponsored by The Archives for Women in Medicine, Harvard Medical Alumni Association, Joint Committee on the Status of Women, Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, The Center for the History of Medicine, Office for Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Partnership, and the Office of Faculty Affairs

 

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Join us for this celebration recognizing important milestones for women at HMS over the past 70 years, including the admittance of women students, creation of The Archives for Women in Medicine, appointment of the 250th woman as a full professor, and more.

 

October 21, 2016

Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

 

Seating is limited. Registration is first come, first served.
Tickets are $75 per person and include symposia, reception, and seated dinner.

For more information and for registration, visit the official event page.

October 20: “Dr. Saul Hertz Discovers the Medical Uses of Radioiodine”

By , September 21, 2016

Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present:

Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine

“Dr Saul Hertz (HMS’29) Discovers The Medical Uses of Radioiodine (RAI): Academic Politics and Prejudice In the Birth of Radionuclide Therapy ”

Lewis E. Braverman, M.D., F.A.C.E.: Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine
Frederick H. Fahey, D.Sc.:  Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School
M. Sara Rosenthal, Ph.D.:  Professor of Bioethics, University of Kentucky

 

800px-SaulHertz_PortraitThe first in a series of three lectures given as the 2016 Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine. The Colloquium offers an opportunity to clinicians, researchers, and historians interested in a historical perspective on their fields to discuss informally historical studies in progress.

 

Thursday, October 20, 2016
4:00-5:30 PM

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

For further information contact David G. Satin, M.D., Colloquium Director, phone/fax 617-332-0032, e-mail david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

November 3: 41st Annual Joseph Garland Lecture “Less Medicine More Health”

By , September 13, 2016

The Boston Medical Library presents:

Less Medicine, More Health

41st Annual Garland Lecture

H. Gilbert Welch, M.D., M.Ph.: Professor of Medicine, Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Research

 

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Dr. H. Gilbert Welch brings a needed perspective to medical care. It’s not to deny that some people get too little medical care, rather that the conventional concern about “too little” needs to be balanced with a concern about “too much”: too many people being made to worry about diseases they don’t have—and are at only average risk to get; too many people being tested and exposed to the harmful effects of the testing process; too many people being subjected to treatments they don’t need—or can’t benefit from.

The American public has been sold the idea that seeking medical care is one of the most important steps to maintain wellness. Surprisingly, medical care is not, in fact, well correlated with good health. So more medicine does not equal more health; in reality the opposite may be true.

The general public harbors assumptions about medical care that encourage overuse, assumptions such as it’s always better to fix the problem, sooner (or newer) is always better, or it never hurts to get more information.

For the past two decades, Dr. Welch’s research has focused on the problems created by medicine’s efforts to detect disease early: physicians test too often, treat too aggressively and tell too many people that they are sick. Much of his work has focused on overdiagnosis in cancer screening: in particular, screening for melanoma, thyroid, lung, breast and prostate cancer. He is the author of the books, Should I be Tested for Cancer? Maybe Not and Here’s Why (UC Press 2004) and more recently, Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health (Beacon Press 2011) and Less Medicine, More Health: 7 Assumptions That Drive Too Much Medical Care (Beacon Press 2015).

 

November 3, 2016

5:30 PM

Amphitheater, Armenise Building
Harvard Medical School
210 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115


To register, please contact the Boston Medical Library at BostonMedLibr@gmail.com or 617-432-4807.

September 20, 2016 – The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich

By , August 5, 2016

The Center for the History of Medicine presents:

The Anatomy of Murder: Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich

SabineCover_Full_SmallSabine Hildebrandt, M.D.: Assistant Professor in the Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School

Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its racialist dogma. As historian and anatomist Sabine Hildebrandt reveals, however, their complicity with the Nazi state went beyond the merely ideological. They progressed through gradual stages of ethical transgression, turning increasingly to victims of the regime for body procurement, as the traditional model of working with bodies of the deceased gave way, in some cases, to a new paradigm of experimentation with the “future dead.”

 

Tuesday, September 20, 2016
6:00pm

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, use our online registration form or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

April 21, 2016 – Prescription Drug Abuse in American History

By , March 21, 2016

The Boston Medical Library presents the 12th J. Worth Estes, M.D. History of Medicine Lecture:

Prescription Drug Abuse in American History:

Lessons from a Century of Failures and Occasional Successes

 

americandruggist_refDavid Herzberg, Ph.D.: Associate Professor in the Department of History, State University of New York at Buffalo

Dr. Herzberg specializes in the history of medicine with a particular interest in how encounters with health and illness have been transformed in America’s 20th century consumer culture. His work explores these issues in the context of modern prescription pharmaceuticals, especially sedatives, stimulants, and painkillers.

Among other places, this work has appeared in the American Journal of Public Health, American Quarterly, The Atlantic Monthly Online, and in a book, Happy Pills in America: From Miltown to Prozac (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). He is currently writing a history of prescription drug abuse in the 20th century. For more information on the speaker see http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~herzberg/index.html.

 

The Estes Lecture was named in honor of J. Worth Estes, M.A., M.D. (1934-2000). Dr. Estes was a professor at the Boston University School of Medicine and editor of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. In addition he was the author of numerous articles and books on the history of medicine. The Estes Lecture was established in 2000 by his wife and colleagues at the Boston Medical Library. It is presented by the Boston Medical Library and covers topics on the history of medicine.

 

Thursday, April 21, 2016
5:30pm

Carl W. Walter Amphitheater
Tosteson Medical Education Center
Harvard Medical School
260 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115

To RSVP, contact Katherine Flannery at 617-432-7294 or email BostonMedLibr@gmail.com.

Records Management Workshops

By , March 16, 2016

This spring, the Archives and Records Management program will be hosting a series of workshops to help you manage the records of your office. All workshops are free and open to members of the HMS/HSDM community.

For more information or to arrange for in-department seminars, visit our website, call the Archives and Records Management program at 617-432-6193, or email arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Introduction to the General Records Schedule

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Do you know how long you need to keep your office records, and what you should do when you no longer need them? In this workshop, we’ll help de-mystify records retention by showing you how to use and understand the Harvard University General Records Schedule (GRS). We’ll give you all the information you need to:

  • Identify your records using the GRS
  • Determine how long to keep your records
  • Decide if records should be destroyed or archived
  • Know who to contact if the GRS doesn’t describe your records

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Managing Your Paper Records: Off-Site Records Storage

Wednesday, March 16, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Run out of room for files in your office that you need to keep? The Harvard Depository records center is the perfect place for your office, department, or lab to store records that you need to keep but don’t use every day. In this workshop, we’ll review step-by-step instructions for:

  • How to set up an account
  • How to pack and label boxes correctly
  • How to complete transfer paperwork
  • How to recall records back to your office

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Familiarity with the General Records Schedule (GRS) is helpful but not required. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

 

Managing Your Electronic Records: Shared Drives & Email

Wednesday, May 4, 2016
11:00am

Center for the History of Medicine Conference Room
Countway Library, Floor L2

Does it take ages to find a file in your shared drive? Are you running out of room in your email box? Save yourself and your office time and money by learning to manage your electronic records. In this workshop, we’ll help you manage your email and electronic records efficiently and effectively by giving you guidelines for:

  • Naming and organizing your files for fast and easy access
  • Developing a file plan for your office shared drive
  • Determining which emails you should keep, and how to store them
  • Learning how to keep your digital records in compliance with Harvard’s records management policies

Workshops are about an hour long. Attendance is free and open to all members of the HMS/HSDM community. Familiarity with the General Records Schedule (GRS) is helpful but not required. Registration is encouraged to insure sufficient space for all participants. To register, email us at arm@hms.harvard.edu.

March 8, 2016 – Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England

By , March 7, 2016

The Archives for Women in Medicine, a program of the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine’s Center for the History of Medicine, presents:

Ill Composed: Sickness, Gender, and Belief in Early Modern England

IllComposedOlivia Weisser, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor of History, University of Massachusetts Boston

Olivia Weisser is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She earned a PhD in the History of Medicine from Johns Hopkins University and specializes in the history of the body, gender, and sexuality in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Her talk is based on her first book, Ill Composed (Yale Press, 2015), which explores health and healing in early modern England from the patient’s point of view.

 

Tuesday, March 8, 2016
6:00pm

Reception begins at 5:30pm.

Minot Room, fifth floor
Countway Library of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
10 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

Free and open to the public.

Registration is required. To register, use our online registration form or email us at ContactChom@hms.harvard.edu.

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